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Monday, December 15, 2014

Nurse Practitioner Waives Hearing

A Bradford nurse practitioner accused of writing prescriptions she wasn’t authorized to write waived a preliminary hearing in Kane today.

The state attorney general’s office says 54-year-old Darlene Venezia Skaggs wrote two prescriptions for Oxycodone at her home, and then met a former patient and gave the prescriptions to him. She had been terminated from Medicor Associates at the time she wrote the prescriptions. According to court papers, she said she wrote them because the man “legitimately needed them.”

She is facing similar charges in five other cases.

Venezia-Skaggs remains free on unsecured bail.

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Anonymous said...

What an I'll informed journalist. Please get your facts straight.

Anne Holliday said...

If there are facts that are not in the court records which I referenced, I would certainly print them if you could provide them to me.

Anonymous said...

If this women didn't do what she is being charged with then why would she be getting in trouble for it? I believe that it is indeed true. Didn't think a nurse could give people medication in the first place. You must be a doctor with a degree?!.

Anne Holliday said...

A nurse practitioner has to go through much more schooling than a registered nurse and is authorized to write prescriptions.

Stony! said...

Well, sometimes there is a fine line between prescribing a drug that is being abused, and somebody really needing the drug. The drugs she allegedly prescribed are commonly abused, or used for recreational enjoyment. I guess this will go to court and the courts will decide if she was writing legitimate prescriptions. Annon ..... don't shoot the messenger .... Anne does a pretty good job getting her stories right.

Anne Holliday said...

For anyone who missed the follow-up story two days later: The second set of charges was withdrawn as part of a plea agreement in this case.

I think cases like this show that someone needs to rethink Pennsylvania's controlled substance laws. Not everyone who needs Vicodin or Oxycodone, etc. is a drug addict, or abusing it, and I think it's sad that the laws/regulations make it so hard for people who, as this woman said, "legitimately need(ed) them."