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Saturday, June 28, 2008

Young to Inspect Storm Damage

In response to extensive damage caused by recent hail storms to food and vegetable growers around the region and state, Senator Catharine Young, (R,I,C – Olean), Chair of the State Senate Agriculture Committee, will be touring storm-ravaged farms in Chautauqua County to survey the devastation, is spearheading communication between the federal government to help alleviate the situation.

Last week, Senator Young urged growers from around the state who sustained damage from severe wind and hail storms to report any damage to their crop loss adjusters and the USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA).

“This Sunday, I will be touring two farms in Chautauqua County to inspect the damage and begin to lay the groundwork for a course of action,” said Senator Young. “I’ve formally asked the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Edward Schafer to include our recent storm within the scope of the disasters covered by the newly-adopted disaster assistance program. We also need to ensure that the recently re-authorized Tree Assistance Program will apply to New York’s devastating storm event.”

Senator Young organized 13 state senators co-sign a letter she penned to Secretary Schafer to ask for his help. These senators represent regions around the state that also were storm damaged.

On June 16, 2008, hail and wind storms swept through New York State, from the farthest western reaches of Chautauqua and Erie Counties to the lower Hudson Valley, leaving behind sporadic but devastating damage for growers. Reports have reached our offices of grape growers whose vineyards appear to have been attacked by machine gun fire, of corn and soybeans literally shredded by golf ball size hail, and fresh vegetables, apples, peaches and cherries pockmarked by hail.

“New York farmers were looking forward to one of their best years with increasing demand for locally grown produce and forging new marketing opportunities on a daily basis,” the Senator said. “Without immediate action, that stability is threatened by weather-induced losses that have affected grapes, vegetables, corn and soybeans. We must act quickly to ensure further economic damage isn’t done.”

Young will be touring the farm of Ed and Ruth Szumigala of Sheridan on Sunday, June 29 at 11:00 a.m. at Route 39 and 20 near Newell Road with a representative of the New York Farm Bureau. The Senator will then go to Craig Lembke’s operation at 3167 Route 39 in Forestville to inspect the damage.

Goodell: Bills Will Stay in Buffalo

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says he believes the Buffalo Bills will be in Western New York for a long time. Speaking at the Chautauqua Institution yesterday, Goodell addressed fears that the Bills would relocate to Toronto. He says with the additional revenue the team will generate from playing a game north of the border the franchise's future is more secure. Under the deal, which begins this year and runs through 2012, the Bills will become the first NFL team to play an annual regular-season game outside the United States.

More on 'Operation Family Cookout'

The husband and wife who police say operated a methamphetamine laboratory from their Albion home were arraigned on multiple charges Friday in Millcreek Township. Authorities had been looking for Ronald and Patricia Frey since March 14 when the state attorney general's office charged them and 27 co-defendants with possessing and manufacturing meth as part of Operation Family Cookout. The couple was arrested in Florida after some people overheard the Freys talking about being wanted by police. Those people tipped off authorities. Ronald Frey was sent to Erie County Prison in lieu of $600,000 straight bond. Patricia Frey was sent to the prison in lieu of $500,000 straight bond. Ronald Frey's brother, James Frey, was also charged in what the Attorney General's Office said was the oldest known methamphetamine operation in northwestern Pennsylvania.

4-Vehicle Accident on I-86

No one was hurt in a 4-vehicle accident at about 9:30 Friday night on the I-86 Bridge in the Town of Ellery. Chautauqua County Sheriff's Deputies say a motorcycle swerved into the path of a car driven by Jennifer Maurer of Jamestown. She hit the guide rail, then came to rest in the middle of the bridge. Brian Schott of Warren stopped to see if Maurer was OK. A car driven by 16-year-old Victoria Wessel of Lakewood slowed down to avoid the stopped cars, but another vehicle driven by 76-year-old Ulla Larsen of Jamestown hit the Wessel vehicle from behind and pushed it into Schott's vehicle. No charges will be filed.

Two Related Burglaries in Shinglehouse

Coudersport state police are investigating two related burglaries in Shinglehouse. They say someone kicked open the door of a garage belonging to Phillip Urban and took a chainsaw, a tool set, a tool box, a generator and a meat grinder. The value of the stolen items is nearly $3,000. The other burglary happened in a garage and home owned by Thomas Kemp. The items taken include an antique desk valued at $300.

O'Brien Indicted by Grand Jury

A Cattaraugus County Grand Jury has handed up an indictment against a retired New York State trooper accused of killing a Bradford woman in a drunk driving accident. 68-year-old David O'Brien of Allegany pleaded innocent to charges of vehiclular manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide and driving while intoxicated. On April 26, his car hit a car driven by 38-year-old Wendy Karnes along Route 219. They were both on their way to work at the Seneca Allegany Casino. O'Brien's next court appearance is scheduled for August 1. He's free on his own recognizance.

Friday, June 27, 2008

Olean Alderman Pleads Guilty

An Olean Alderman has pleaded guilty to a petit larceny charge. 22-year-old Andrew Searles took a pre-paid gas card from Mastel Ford while he worked there. He is required to pay $600 in restitution, court costs and fines. If he doesn't pay it within 60 days, he'll be re-sentenced. Searles says he plans to be on the ballot in November to keep his seat on Common Council.

Committee Approves Cleland

McKean County Judge John Cleland and three others have been endorsed by the Senate Judiciary Committee to fill temporary vacancies on Pennsylvania's appellate courts. If confirmed by the Senate, the nominees will serve until 2010, when the judges elected next year will be sworn in for 10-year terms. All four have agreed not to run for a full term. Cleland and and Robert Freedberg of Northampton County would serve on the Superior Court. Philadelphia Judge Jane Cutler Greenspan was tapped to fill an opening on the state Supreme Court. Former state labor commissioner Johnny Butler is nominated for a seat on the Commonwealth Court.

New Residence Hall: Fesenmyer House

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford will name its new residence hall in honor of Howard Fesenmyer, a retired Zippo Manufacturing Co. executive who is executive secretary of the Blaisdell Foundation, a board member of Zippo, and a member of the advisory board of Pitt-Bradford, where he is a leader in fundraising.

The University of Pittsburgh Board of Trustees approved the naming of Fesenmyer House at its annual meeting today in Pittsburgh. Fesenmyer attended the meeting.

Fesenmyer House will become home to 144 students this fall. Pitt-Bradford broke ground for the $7.3 million residence hall last July. It is located near Blaisdell Hall.

“Never in my wildest dreams would I ever have thought this could happen to me,” Fesenmyer said. “I am humbled, honored and pleased, and I thank Pitt-Bradford for this remarkable recognition.”

Livingston Alexander, president of Pitt-Bradford, said, “Howard is not only a major fundraiser for Pitt-Bradford, but he also is our greatest cheerleader and advocate.

“What drives Howard to ask for a gift is precisely what motivates our donors to give—an unselfish dedication to our campus and an abiding commitment to our students.”

Fesenmyer has been chair of the institutional advancement council of Pitt-Bradford’s advisory board for more than a decade, helping to lead teams of volunteers to successfully raise $10 million for the campus’ Campaign 2000 and also serving as chair of the Complete the Campus Campaign, which raised $13.1 million for campus construction; the Reed-Coit Scholarship Challenge, which raised $2 million for scholarships; and the Blaisdell Fine Arts Challenge, which raised $3.4 million to build Blaisdell Hall. He is currently spearheading the fundraising campaign for a campus interfaith chapel, to be built solely with private donations.

In 1998, Pitt-Bradford awarded Fesenmyer its highest honor, the Presidential Medal of Distinction, given to those who make significant contributions to the campus and the community.

“I cannot think of a single volunteer who has had more of an impact on raising support for Pitt-Bradford and advancing the college than Howard,” said Karen Niemic Buchheit, Pitt-Bradford’s executive director of institutional advancement. “His enthusiasm for, and devotion to, Pitt-Bradford is contagious—which is the reason he has been so successful in garnering such support.”

Fesenmyer House will bring Pitt-Bradford’s on-campus resident capacity to 800 students. It is a three-story building with 21 four-person suites, 10 five-person suites, and five two-person suites. Each bedroom will have a private bathroom, cable hookup, telephone jack, and computer port. Students will share a living room, kitchen, and storage area.

A formal ribbon-cutting and dedication ceremony is planned for Sept. 5.

Fesenmyer, who earned the Bachelor of Science degree at Clarion University of Pennsylvania, was an executive at Zippo from 1953 to 1991, when he retired as executive vice president. In addition to performing his extensive volunteer work for Pitt-Bradford, Fesenmyer is a trustee of the Bradford Family YMCA, the YWCA of Bradford, Guthrie Medical Center (Sayre, Pa.), and the Bradford Area Public Library. He is a member of the board of directors of Beacon Light Behavioral Health Systems, the Bradford Educational Foundation, the Bradford Exchange Club, the Friendship Table, and Isbrand Co. (Denmark). He also is a member of the Bradford Area Alliance.

Fesenmyer and his wife, Dorothea, live in Bradford.

More on Church Shooting

Earlier reports that the victim in a church shooting had died were premature.

Jim Dixon, and the person who shot him, are both on life support at an Altoona Hospital and are being kept alive for organ donation, according to the Blair County Coroner.

Norman Kauffman shot Dixon Thursday morning in the Trinity United Methodist Church in Clearfield. Pastor Bob Rupp said Dixon was retired and worked as the church's maintenance worker to keep busy. Kauffman served as the church's computer teacher.

For eight hours, Kauffman led police through Moshannon State Forest's network of dirt roads, which stretch into Elk, Centre and Cameron counties.

When police found him, he was immediately flown to the hospital because of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Pinpointing Sleep Disorders Faster

By George Nianiatus, senior writer
Communications Department


Pinpointing sleep disorders will be far easier and faster to accomplish now that Bradford Regional Medical Center officials have purchased state-of-the-art sleep diagnostic equipment from industry leader Nihon Kohden Corp.

The hospital’s two-bed Sleep Clinic on the third floor of the Outpatient Services Center has new polysomnography equipment to study sleep disorders, including sleep apnea which results when people stop breathing repeatedly during the night.

“This new equipment from Nihon Kohden provides us with digital real-time video where our fully trained staff can instantly see sleep activity, ranging from sleep apnea, snoring, insomnia and restless leg syndrome” says Penny Oyler, BRMC’s director of Cardiopulmonary Services and also the Sleep Clinic. Earlier equipment did not provide
video capability.

“Any person who has these sleep disorder symptoms can undergo a study at BRMC’s Sleep Clinic but they must be referred by a physician,” Ms. Oyler notes.

The Polysmith diagnostic equipment and two amplifiers will closely monitor electrocardiograms (EKGs) for heart activity, electroencephalograms (EEGs) for brain activity, breathing, oxygen and carbon dioxide content in the blood stream, and body positioning while asleep.

“What’s new is this equipment has better sensors that can pick up respiratory or sleep events,” says Frank Arnal, M.D., FCCP, a pulmonologist board-certified in sleep medicine at BRMC.

“A greater number of sensors on this new equipment means BRMC can monitor children who may have sleep disorders, including sleep apnea,” Dr. Arnal notes.

BRMC’s Sleep Clinic previously had the ability to perform sleep studies on children but doing so now will be an easier process, states Ms. Oyler.

“The hospital is very pleased to be able to offer the latest in sleep study technology. This is a service we are proud to have available for our community,” states Deborah L. Price, BRMC’s senior vice president of Patient Care Services.
“This is the latest technology that meets the standards of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine,” Ms. Oyler notes.

Initial sleep studies are for one night at BRMC. ”The results are then read by sleep specialist Dr. Arnal and sent to the individual’s referring physician. But if obstructive or central sleep apnea is diagnosed, for example, patients will need to come back for a second night at a later date to prepare for prescribed therapies,” Ms. Oyler says.

Most insurance companies cover sleep studies, she adds. Along with having new monitoring equipment, BRMC’s Sleep Clinic will expand from operating three days to five days a week.

“This means we’ll have greater capability to monitor far more people with sleep disorders,” Ms. Oyler says.

A national trend shows sleep disorders have been on the rise. “The incidence has continued to go up because there’s an association with obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Some estimates say 25 percent of people now have some type of sleep disorder,” Dr. Arnal says.

“Sleep disorders can run the gamut from mild, moderate and severe where there’s an increased chance of arrhythmias (irregular heart activity) and even sudden death,” Dr. Arnal comments.

Severe sleep apnea is a pattern of upper airway obstruction that can cause death. “When people are sleeping they are breathing but the upper airway collapses and prevents air from entering the lungs. The body senses this and then it wakes up and that relieves the obstruction.

“This occurs in a cyclical pattern, sometimes as much as 100 times an hour. This kind of pattern causes non-restorative sleep and increased risk of stroke or heart attack,” Dr. Arnal explains. Now, apnea and other sleep disorders will be detected with greater efficiency at BRMC.

“Our community will now benefit from having state-of-the-art sleep lab technology right here in our own backyard,” says William McClain, M.D., medical director of BRMC’s Sleep Clinic.

In addition to the new equipment for improved diagnostics, “We have exceptionally trained staff dedicated to implementing the most advanced polysomnographic techniques,” Dr. McClain notes. “We are looking forward to continuing our growth throughout BRMC in an ongoing effort to ensure the highest quality health care for our community.”

Scam Artists in Prentisvale

The scam artists who targeted an elderly couple in Emporium this week could have been in McKean County, too. Peggy Grimes said a man came to her Prentisvale house Tuesday saying that he needed to see her property line because he was cutting down trees for the state. After several minutes outside with the man, Mrs. Grimes said she wanted to go back inside to check on her 88-year-old husband. That's when she learned someone was in the house. She says she doesn't think anything is missing from the house, but someone did rummage through her cedar chest.

Rendell Interested in Cabinet Post

Gov. Ed Rendell says he would be interested in serving in a prospective Obama administration as a Cabinet member once he leaves his state office. In a talk-show appearance on WITF-TV in Harrisburg on Thursday night, Rendell said he "absolutely" is interested in an eventual appointment as head of the federal departments of energy or transportation. Rendell has repeatedly said he intends to complete his second term, which expires in January 2011, and is not interested in becoming the running mate for Democratic presidential nominee-apparent Barack Obama.

Grand Jury Report Due Today

A Cattaraugus County Grand Jury is expected to release its findings today on the head-on crash that killed a Bradford woman in April. Retired State Police investigator David O'Brien of Allegany is accused of hitting a car driven by 38-year-old Wendy Karnes on Route 219. Karnes was pronounced dead at the scene. O’Brien was charged with driving while intoxicated, second- degree vehicular manslaughter and various vehicle and traffic violations. Both O’Brien and Karnes were on their way to work at the Seneca Allegany Casino in Salamanca at the time of the accident.

Geyer Waives Preliminary Hearing

A Marienville woman accused of embezzling more than $200,000 from the Laurel Laser and Surgery Center in Brookville has waived her preliminary hearing. 45-year-old Deborah Geyer is facing 471 felony and 157 misdemeanor charges and remains in Jefferson County Jail in lieu of $200,000 bond. Police say Geyer diverted the money from December of 2001 to October of 2007 while she worked as the patient accounts manager.

Teen in ICU After Rim Rock Fall

An 18-year-old from Russell is hospitalized in serious condition after falling about 80 feet down a cliff at the Rim Rock recreation area on the Allegheny National Forest Wednesday.

Alicia Amroski, who just graduated from Eisenhower High School, was walking south of the developed overlook at Rim Rock when she fell.

The people she was with called 9-1-1.

She was taken to Kinzua Beach, then taken by helicopter to an Erie hospital, where she is in the intensive care unit.

Thursday, June 26, 2008

UPDATE on Church Shooting

After a nearly eight-hour search a Penfield man accused of shooting another man at Trinity United Methodist Church in Clearfield Thursday morning was apprehended in the Moshannon State Forest.

The shooting happened around 6:30 this morning. The victim was seriously injured and is being treated at a Clearfield-area hospital.

The victim's name was not released.

The suspect, Norman Kaufman, turned himself in, but is being treated for a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Kaufman is facing a charge of criminal attempt to commit homicide and related charges.

UPDATE on Church Shooting

A man is in serious condition after being shot this morning at Trinity United Methodist Church in Clearfield.

Clearfield police say the suspect, believed to be Norman Kauffman of Penfield, walked into the church at about 6:30 at shot a maintenance worker.

The victim has not been identified.

Police are still looking for Kauffman in Clearfield, Elk and Centre counties. He's is driving a white pickup truck with a license plate beginning with the letters Y-J-M. Kauffman is considered arms and dangerous.

Emerald Ash Borer Moves North

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has banned the transport of firewood from Mercer County after state workers found evidence of the emerald ash borer this morning. Ash borers are invasive and destructive beetles that destroy ash trees. They were first spotted in Pennsylvania in 2007. The state responded with a quarantine on firewood from Allegheny, Beaver, Butler and Lawrence counties. Survey workers from the Department of Agriculture have set traps for ash borers throughout in region, including several in the City of Bradford. The traps are those purple boxes hanging from trees. No insects have been found in this region.

Man Shot in Clearfield Church

Police are searching for a gunman who shot a man in a Clearfield Church this morning.
The shooting happened around 6:30 at Trinity United Methodist Church. Police say a man entered the church and shot a maintenance worker then fled in his vehicle. Police believe the man is driving on dirt roads that stretch into Elk and Centre counties. The victim was transported to the hospital for treatment and his condition was not immediately known.

Firefighters 'Boot Day' is Friday

The Bradford City Firefighters 11th Annual Boot Day to benefit "Jerry's Kids" is tomorrow.

Fireman Chris Angell tells WESB and The HERO that MDA Ambassador Alex Joyce from Titusville, as well as several other MDA representatives will be in Bradford, and one of them will have a service dog.

All the money collected during Boot Day goes to the local Muscular Dystrophy Association. Among the things the money pays for are wheelchairs, braces and summer camp.

The firefighters will be out from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday at the intersection of Davis and Boylston streets, and also at Northwest Savings Bank on West Washington Street.

The International Association of Firefighters is the biggest contributor to Jerry's Kids.

BonaResponds Going to Iowa

By Kathleen M. Moulton

ST. BONAVENTURE, N.Y., June 26, 2008 - BonaResponds, St. Bonaventure University's disaster-relief squad, has announced plans for a relief trip to Iowa to help the victims of the recent flooding, and they need your help.

The group, led by founder Dr. James Mahar, assistant finance professor at St. Bonaventure, will be making the 12-hour drive on Monday, July 7, and will work through July 13.

BonaResponds will be working in the Cedar Rapids area in conjunction with other disaster-relief groups, such as Hands on Disaster Response and Randy's Rangers. Work will include cleanup, gutting interiors, mold abatement, putting up drywall, painting, rough electrical work, and more. There is also a need for volunteers to cook and clean the camp, run errands, help organize work orders, and to be present and talk with the victims.

The group expects to start work in the small community of Palo. According to Mahar, Palo has 500 homes, 470 of which have flood damage. "This definitely shows the need for volunteers is there," he said.

Two BonaResponders are currently in Iowa working with Hands On. Recent graduates Mike Vieyra and Tessa Ocke arrived on June 22. Vieyra was impressed by the attitude and work ethic of the people who had so recently lost everything.

"The Midwest attitude is to put your head down and get to work. The people here are very grateful for our help and are more than willing to work right along with you, which is not always the case in service trips," he said.

Vieyra, a veteran of the group, also explained that the victims are not the only ones who benefit from the trip. "The physical work you do is important, but it's not half of what makes these trips what they are. The people you meet-fellow volunteers, homeowners, as well as people from the local communities-truly make the trip the life-changing experience that it is," he said.

Thanks to a $500 donation and the generous use of the University's vans, the cost of the trip will be $100 per person. This includes ground transportation and three meals a day. Volunteers can also meet the group there; ground transport can be arranged from Cedar Rapids Airport.

BonaResponders will be staying in a church hall and showering at the local YMCA. A sleeping bag is recommended.

Like all BonaResponds events, this mission is open to anyone over 18 (16 with parental supervision). Volunteers are asked to bring steel-toed boots, proof of insurance, an up-to-date tetanus shot, and a good attitude.

For more information, visit www.BonaResponds.org.

JCC Dean Hurt in Crash

The assistant dean of admissions at Jamestown Community College is in an Elmira hospital after an accident on Interstate 86 early Wednesday morning. The Steuben County Sheriff's Department says 58-year-old Paul Hedberg was stopped in the eastbound lane around 1 a.m., following a separate accident when a tractor-trailer overturned and blocked the road. While Hedberg was stopped on the interstate, another tractor trailer failed to stop for the line of cars and hit Hedberg's car, sending it 50 yards onto the right side of the road. Hedberg was airlifted to the hospital for treatment of head and leg injuries. He underwent surgery during the day Wednesday.

Couple Charged After Allegedly Dropping Baby On Its Head

A mother and father have been charged with endangering the welfare of a child after the mother dropped a baby on its head while they were leaving a hospital. Chautauqua County Sheriff's say 22-year-old Daniel L. Palmer and 18-year-old Kelly A. Blakeslee of Ripley agreed not to report the incident to the hospital. Deputies say they received a report from child protective services on May 2nd that a newborn may have sustained injuries at a home in Ripley after it was released from Brooks Memorial Hospital in Jamestown. Investigators were able to determine the child was hurt prior to leaving the hospital, when Blakeslee dropped the newborn on the floor, and the baby landed on its head.

Brookville Man Dies When Lawnmower Rolls On Top of Him

A Brookville man is dead after his lawn mower rolled on top of him while he was hauling rocks. Police say 87-year-old Bill Thompson was hauling rocks on his property using a lawn mower and a cart. He backed the cart up an embankment to unload it and lost control, causing the lawn mower, cart and Thompson to roll down the hill. The accident happened between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Tuesday, but Thompson's body was not found until Wednesday.

Woman Hurt at Rim Rock

A woman was seriously injured in a fall Wednesday morning at the Rim Rock Overlook Area in the Allegheny National Forest. The U.S. Forest Service says the lady fell between 40 and 80 feet. The victim was taken to Kinzua Beach then flown by helicopter to an out of town hospital for treatment. The fall was reported at about 10 a.m and rescue personnel were on the scene until after noon.

Pitchford Appointed to RHA Board

The Pennsylvania Rural Health Association recently announced the appointment of Ed Pitchford, president and chief executive officer of Charles Cole Memorial Hospital, to its board of directors. Pitchford is active in promoting rural health issues as a member of the executive committee of the hospital and Health Systems Association of Pennsylvania Small and Rural Council and its Public Policy Committee.

“Citizens who chose to work and live in rural areas should have access to the same level and quality of basic healthcare services as those who are in urban or metropolitan areas. Obviously there will be differences in availability when it comes to specialized care that is only provided in certain cities. This reality raises the importance of patient transportation in rural areas such as Coudersport. PRHA has a significant voice in the state and I look forward to working with my fellow board of directors to ensure that this state has a rural healthcare delivery system second to none,” he said.

According to its website, PRHA is a non profit organization dedicated to enhancing the health and well-being of Pennsylvania’s rural citizens and communities. Through the combined efforts of individuals, organizations, professionals, and community leaders, the association is a collective voice for rural health issues and a conduit for information and resources. PRHA serves as an advocate for rural health issues and development at the local, state, and federal levels, it provides continuing education and leadership development opportunities for rural health professionals and it fosters cooperative partnerships to improve rural health.

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Peterson: When Will Pelosi Get It?

Washington, DC – With the July 4th Congressional recess around the corner and the price at the pump increasing daily, Speaker Pelosi and the Democratic Leadership have yet to schedule energy production legislation for floor consideration. Each day this Congress fails to act is another day the American people suffer, small businesses close their doors and industries moves overseas where energy is more affordable.

Congressman John E. Peterson (R-Pa.), a staunch advocate of increased domestic energy production, conservation, and alternative energy sources, joined fellow Republicans at a press conference today to address the Energy Crisis in America. Peterson issued the following statement:

“The right to affordable, reliable, American-made energy is a right that no citizen of this great nation should be denied. Yet, Congress and the last three presidents have locked up vast offshore reserves – estimated at 37 years of imported oil from OPEC and 17 years of natural gas. With oil prices hovering at $135 per barrel and natural gas tipping $13 daily – double last year’s price – Congress needs to put political differences aside and act in the best interest of the American people.

“The public overwhelmingly supports increased domestic energy production. Speaker Pelosi and her leadership team should heed the advice of the American people – who suffer daily to make ends meet – and pass responsible energy legislation before recessing for Independence Day.

“In my repeated efforts over the years to unlock offshore energy reserves, I have always enjoyed wide support in Congress. Despite this bipartisan support, Speaker Pelosi continues to stonewall any effort to increase domestic energy production. Folks, increasing domestic energy production offshore is not a partisan issue, yet Speaker Pelosi, the Sierra Club and Greenpeace have taken an issue that 76 percent of Americans support, and turned it into a political football. Unfortunately, the only ones getting kicked are the American people.”

Memorial for Dunham in Ridgway

A memorial will be dedicated to Marine Corporal Jason Dunham Saturday in Ridgway. Dunham died April 22, 2004, when he used his helmet to shield two fellow Marines from a grenade thrown by an Iraqi insurgent. The other two Marines survived the blast. Dunham, who was from Scio, NY, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor by President George Bush, and the U.S. Navy has named a guided missile destroyer, the U.S.S. Jason Dunham, after him. The ship will be christened in 2009 and will be commissioned in 2010. Dunham spent his summers in Ridgway with his grandparents and aunts and uncles. The memorial will be at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5887, and will contain an American flag that was flown in from Iraq from the base where Dunham was stationed.

Howard Waives Extradition

The Corry woman accused of killing her 6-year-old son in a drunk driving accident waived her right to extradition at a hearing this morning in Hamilton, Ohio. Erin Howard has been in jail since Saturday, when she was furloughed from the Erie County Prison to attend her son's funeral in Ohio. Instead of returning to Erie, she allegedly went to a bar. Now she faces escape charges in addition to the charges related to the accident that killed her son, Sam Carpenter. She'll be taken back to Erie next week.

Randolph Woman Makes History

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates has announced that the President has nominated Lt. Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody of the Army for appointment to the grade of general and assignment as commander, Army Materiel Command.

"Women continue to achieve great success and make invaluable contributions to the defense of this nation. This is an historic occasion for the Department of Defense and I am proud to nominate Lt. Gen. Ann Dunwoody for a fourth star,” said Secretary Gates. “Her 33 years of service, highlighted by extraordinary leadership and devotion to duty, make her exceptionally qualified for this senior position.”

Dunwoody, a former resident of Randolph, NY, was commissioned in 1975 and has served in several positions of command, to include commanding general of Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee, and deputy chief of staff, Logistics. She is currently the deputy commanding general/chief of staff, Army Materiel Command. If confirmed by the Senate, she will be the first female four-star general in American history.

Dunwoody graduated from SUNY Cortland in 1975. She attended Randolph schools but graduated in Europe.

The first female service member to achieve the rank of Brigadier General was Col. Anna Mae Hays, chief of the Army Nurse Corps, on June 11, 1970. There are currently 57 active-duty female general officers in the Armed Forces, five of whom are lieutenant generals.

Changes to ANF Recreation

Sugar Bay and Tracy Ridge would be decommissioned and the Kiasutha Recreation Area would be closed in cost-cutting moves by the US Forest Service. If at least 12 sites in need of upgrades in the Bradford and Marienville districts are closed instead of repaired, the forest service estimates it could save more than 3 million dollars.
Also, the Dewdrop Recreation Area, Kinzua Beach and the Kinzua Point Information Center would be partially decommissioned. If approved, the changes would happen over the next few years.

Rigases Sentences Reduced

John and Timothy Rigas will be spending less time in prison than they were originally sentenced to. A judge has reduced their sentences by three years. John Rigas had been serving a 15-year prison term, while his son, Timothy, Adelphia's former chief financial officer, was sentenced to 20 years in prison.
The Rigases were convicted of securities fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud and bank fraud. When it collapsed into bankruptcy in 2002, Adelphia was the country's fifth-largest cable TV company.

The LiveLine - June 25

Today I'll be speaking with Marilyn Blackmore about this year's Art in the Wilds at Evergreen Park in Kane this weekend. If you can't listen to the LiveLine at 12:40 p.m. today on WESB, you can find more information at Art in the Wilds.org

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Pastors Pray for Politicians

Local pastors are offering their prayers for local politicians.

Josh Hatcher, Outreach Pastor of Open Arms Community Church, made an offer to Bradford City Council on Tuesday, but first he told a story.

He said during a prayer meeting at his church, his children and another young boy were listening to things they were praying about – including violence and child abuse – then ran off.

When Hatcher went after them, he found them praying that God would be able to help those people. The next day, his 9-year-old son and his 8-year-old best friend wrote a letter to the mayor saying "People are being hurt, beaten and even killed. Please send cops to everyone."

He said the boys are grasping two concepts: Prayer makes a difference, and prayer is important, but we also need to take action.

That's what compelled Hatcher to attend Tuesday's meeting.

"As you guys are doing the business of running the city – which involves dealing with crime, dealing with drugs, dealing with poverty … It also involves working to get grants to make the city a better place."

"I personally believe prayer makes a difference," he said.

"I'm not like some of the Christians you see on TV who will come in and demand that council pray before you meet," Hatcher said.

"What I want to offer you is the fact that we are praying for you. As you guys are doing your daily business, getting ready to send a grant application out, or maybe you're noticing a neighborhood with a lot of crime … send an e-mail, and we'll work to make sure it's being prayed for."

"As a representative of the Christian community … all of the churches in town want to make this community a better place, so when you have things you know we can get involved with that can help, let us know."

He passed out an email address for all the council members and department heads to use if they have a prayer request.

"Anything from crime to grant applications or even your sick grandmother," Hatcher said.

Mayor Tom Riel told Hatcher "Everybody on council appreciates that very much …and we'll take all the help we can get."

Zito Media at City Council

By ANNE HOLLIDAY
WESB/WBRR News Director


Zito Media Communications is building a string of fiber optic rings throughout the county, and will be getting a $200,000 loan from the Bradford Office of Economic and Community Development to build the infrastructure in the Bradford area.

"All of the significant communities in McKean County will be connected to a fiber optic ring and within those communities; local fiber optic rings will be constructed in order to serve the business community in those communities," Jim Rigas of Zito told City Council Tuesday night.

In March, the McKean County Commissioners entered into a construction and ownership agreement with Zito Media to establish a 79-mile fiber optic system throughout the county and parts of neighboring counties.

The system will run in a loop through eight municipalities, including Bradford, Smethport, Kane, Eldred, Lewis Run and Port Allegany and seven “points of interest” including Bradford Regional Airport and the Lafferty Hollow Industrial Park.
Rigas said technology has made it possible to bring high capacity to rural communities and build a business plan that makes sense, which is important for economic development

OECD Executive Director Sara Andrews said "This opens up the doors for other companies to come into the community that we aren't able to recruit because we don't have the capacity."

It will help future economic development as well as existing industries, she said.

Steve Zwerin of Zito added that none of the big telecommunications companies want to build telecommunications infrastructure here, and would rather concentrate on bigger cities.

Mayor Tom Riel said that during a recent meeting of the county's "leaders of industry," everyone was in favor of this.

Council also entered into a loan agreement with Greg Buckner for his Bradford Crematory.

Buckner said the biggest holdup in getting the business started was getting a permit from the Department of Environmental Protection.

He expects the business to be up and running by August.

Also, the OECD will be applying to the state Department of Community and Economic Development on behalf of American Refining Group for a $200,000 loan so the refinery can build a maintenace storage building and water recovery project.

In other matters, council is making changes to the city's regulations for plumbing and plumbing licenses.

Riel explained that people who didn't know what they were doing were applying for plumbing licenses in other cities and bringing them here, and they had to be honored.

"No more Cracker Jack plumbing licenses in Bradford," he said, and added that the changes are long overdue.

Also Tuesday, council approved on final reading the ordinance saying that people have to clean up after their dogs.

"People should be warned to carry a pooper scooper or a cup or a plastic bag," Riel said. "It's kind of a shame that council had to do this but it's something that had to be dealt with."

After the ordinace passed, Dr. Brian MacNamara asked "Do you call the police if someone …?"

"If it's your yard and it upsets you," Riel said, "Yeah."

Rapp Appointed to Serve on Select Information Security Committee

State Rep. Kathy Rapp (R-Warren/McKean/Forest) has been appointed to serve as a member of the House Select Committee on Information Security by Republican Leader Sam Smith (R-Punxsutawney).

The select committee is charged with investigating and reviewing the policies, procedures and practices of the various state agencies, commissions, boards, authorities, councils, departments and offices and the entities they license or regulate to protect the personal information of the people of Pennsylvania.

“Identity theft has become one of the fastest growing crimes in America, causing more than $2 billion in previously inconceivable economic losses to consumers, businesses and government bodies throughout Pennsylvania,” said Rapp. “Law-abiding individuals whose identities have been stolen or otherwise compromised can spend months, years and the majority of their personal assets cleaning up the mess that has been made of their good name and credit record. As one of the Pennsylvania House’s strongest advocates for both comprehensive open records and lobbyist disclosure reforms, I look forward to not only exploring, but enacting tangible reforms to guarantee that any electronic data collected and warehoused by state government does not become convenient, one-stop shopping for Internet hackers or other high-tech identity thieves.”

The select committee must submit a report of its findings and recommendations for any appropriate legislation or other action to the House of Representatives by Nov. 30, 2008.

Study: Senecas Contribute
More Than Bills, Sabres

The Seneca Nation of Indians has released results of a study that details their economic contribution to Western New York. A lobbying consultant to the Nation says the tribe contributes almost as much to the region as the University at Buffalo, and contributes more than the Buffalo Sabres and the Buffalo Bills. Seneca Nation President Mo John used the study to address the state's continuing efforts to collect tax on cigarettes sold by Indians. John says ""Why try to tax Seneca customers when the nation already produces so much state and local revenues simply by leaving it alone."

Penn State: Gas-Drilling Royalties
to Boost Economy

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) — With energy companies rushing to lock up rights to suddenly valuable deposits of natural gas, royalties earned by Pennsylvania landowners will ripple through the broader state economy, according to a Penn State University forecast.

Royalty payments will spur additional spending by landowners throughout the economy and lead to the creation of new jobs that will attract workers, researchers said.

For the complete story, visit pennlive.com.

Fighting for Sciene in Motion

By KIMBERLY MARCOTT WEINBERG
Assistant Director of Communications and Marketing


Proponents of Science in Motion, a popular program that brings high-tech science lab equipment to underserved schools, are once again working overtime to reinstate the program in the commonwealth’s budget.

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford is one of 11 universities around the state with a Science in Motion program, which is funded each year by the state budget.

In a region where the average high school science teacher is given $900 each year with which to buy or repair equipment and purchase supplies, Science in Motion is understandably popular.

“I use the kits all the time because it’s well-organized,” said Kerri Detsch, a biology and physics teacher at Kane Area High School who was helping with a Science in Motion camp held on campus last week for elementary-age students.















Teachers can schedule regular visits with mobile educators who drive a van loaded with the science equipment they need to do basic or advanced labs. The mobile educator can also offer ideas and support.

The value of materials and equipment in just a single visit can easily exceed $10,000, says James Baldwin, director of Science in Motion at Pitt-Bradford, which served 75 teachers in 25 different schools during the 2007-08 school year.

Detsch loves the effect Science in Motion has on her students.

“The students get so excited when they see the Science in Motion van at school. It brings a new interest in science – using this high-tech equipment,” she said.

She said she used to worry that her students weren’t prepared to study science at top colleges, but now she believes they’re ready.

"I don’t feel that they’re stepping out there and that they’re so far behind.”

The learning is valuable for teachers as well as students, Detsch says. “Through Science in Motion, I’m always learning something new.”

In addition to having mobile educators visit their classrooms, teachers can attend workshops where they can learn about new labs that are available and network with other teachers, an aspect highly prized by educators who come from science departments with one or two people.

Despite its popularity, or perhaps because of it, Science in Motion fights each year to be included in the state budget.

When Gov. Ed Rendell unveiled his budget earlier this year, he cut the $2.2 million line for the program.















Being left out of the budget, it turns out, is sort of a backhanded compliment afforded to only the most popular programs. Popular programs often become bargaining chips in the budgeting process, and that appears to be the case with Science in Motion, explains Dr. Don Mitchell, professor emeritus at Juniata College, where Science in Motion was founded.

Although he is now retired from working full time, he continues to help shepherd the program he started through the ups and downs of the state budget process each year.

“Fortunately, many legislators have recognized the value and efficiency of Science in Motion and have championed restoring the money each year,” Mitchell said.

Among those who are trying to help out is Sen. Bob Robbins, R-Greenville. In May, legislation proposed by Robbins passed the senate. If the measure were also to pass in the House of Representatives, it would write Science in Motion into the state school code.

While that measure now waits its turn to be taken up by the House, the fight for next year’s funding continues.

With budget negotiations entering a critical period, Mitchell will be spending lots of time in Harrisburg visiting key legislators. State Sen. Joe Scarnati, R-Brockway, is high on his list. Scarnati is the president pro tempore of the Senate. Pitt-Bradford and all of the schools it serves are part of his district.

“Senator Scarnati and his colleagues have made this a funding priority in previous years because they have seen the positive results in the schools they represent,” Mitchell said.

The House, Mitchell explains, has added $2.2 million for Science in Motion to its budget. In the Senate, Robbins would like to see the line restored to the $3 million that is considered full funding.

“We will continue to make our case for funding restoration and the increase that will maintain the quality of this program,” Mitchell said.


In this photo, Dawn Dietsch, left, who teaches advanced chemistry at Eisenhower High School in Warren County, and Sue Hutchins, a newly retired physics teacher from Sheffield Middle/High School, also in Warren County, build a model of a molecule at a Science in Motion teachers workshop at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford earlier this month. In the other photos, wwo boys look for minnows and insects on the Tunungwant Creek, which runs through the campus at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford; and Bernie Picklo of the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford shows three children a minnow he caught in a net on the Tunungwant Creek at Pitt-Bradford last week. The children are taking part in an elementary school summer science camp sponsored by Science in Motion, a program that brings top-notch science supplies and labs to schools.
(Photos Courtesy of Pitt-Bradford)

What Could Full Funding Do for Pitt-Bradford Sciene in Motion?

One of the many budget scenarios taking place this week in Harrisburg involves a proposal by State Sen. Bob Robbins, R-Greenville, to restore full funding to the Science in Motion program.

For the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford’s program, that would mean an additional $40,000.

Pitt-Bradford Science in Motion Director James Baldwin explains what the program could do with the additional funding.

“With restoration of the $40,000, we could provide many more new labs, increase the amount of equipment that we can provide, continue to increase the number of students whom we, together with our partnering high school faculty, can reach with high-quality, state-of-the-art science equipment, and ensure that there are no disruptions in our service.”

Baldwin also cited concrete examples of what $40,000 could provide:

· 10 Vernier LabQuest handheld computers with built-in software that helps collect and analyze data in the field, as well as in the classroom ($3,290)

· 10 cordless microscopes ($6,019)

· Five analytical balances ($10,450)

· One spectrometer ($13,249)

· Two centrifuges ($3,600)

· One autoclave ($4,325)

The additional money could also help cover rising costs due to the higher price of gasoline and oil. Pitt-Bradford’s Science in Motion program supports a region about the size of the state of Connecticut and travels more than 15,000 miles each year. The hike in gas prices has meant a $2,000 increase in spending on travel.

Higher gas prices have also meant an increase in shipping costs for the materials purchased to take to schools, and higher oil prices are increasing the cost of the materials themselves, such as chemicals, plastics and containers.

Textbook Acess Act Passes

Students strapped with hefty college expenses will get a break on textbooks, thanks to legislation passed in the State Senate, and supported by Senator Catharine Young.

The “Textbook Access Act” puts an end to unfair practices such as book bundling, and creates a more fiscally-sensible market for college textbooks.

“Families have a tough time affording college, and textbook costs have escalated, making it ever harder. Students need relief, and our bill is a common-sense approach that requires transparent marketing and affordable course material,” Senator Young said.

“College opens the door for career paths and economic revitalization. Ensuring reasonable textbook costs allows more people to earn their degrees,” she added.

The bill has been sent to the Assembly for passage, and Governor Paterson is expected to sign it into law.

Camp Sponsors Sought

Nellie Wallace, Bradford Hospital Foundation’s director of annual giving, takes a putt on the practice green at Pine Acres Country Club with some help from Kirk Stauffer, the club’s golf pro. The two met earlier to discuss plans for the upcoming Pine Acres/Bradford Hospital Foundation Pro-Am For Kids that will be held July 7 at the club.
(Photo Courtesy of BRMC)


The popular Pine Acres/Bradford Hospital Foundation Pro-Am For Kids on July 7 may have all its slots filled for 28 teams but there’s still time to be a part of the event as a non-competing sponsor. Proceeds from the charity tournament benefit Helping Hands Retreat, a free children’s bereavement camp, held Aug. 8-10 at Camp Penuel in Eldred. The camp, where registration is still under way, is for children between age 8 and 12 who experienced a loss in their young life. It’s hosted by staff from Bradford Regional Medical Center’s (BRMC) McKean County VNA & Hospice.

“This is the third year we and Bradford Hospital Foundation have held the Pro-Am For Kids tournament and it’s been very well received by our membership, the pros and other golfers. It’s a premier event,” says Kirk Stauffer, Pine Acres golf pro.
Anyone who wants to be a non-competing tournament sponsor can contact Mr. Stauffer at Pine Acres at 814-362-2005, e-mail kstauffer@pineacrescc.com, or call the Foundation at 814-362-3200.

A new twist this year is the charity tournament will have its first female golf pro, Jennifer Eberlein of Lawrence Park Golf Club in Erie. “I approached her and she said she’d love to play,” Mr. Stauffer says, noting, “A few more women wanted to be in the
tournament but they wanted to play with a female pro.”

One golfer thrilled to see the first female pro play in the tournament is Virginia Hauser, executive director of Bradford Hospital Auxiliary. ”We are really excited for the opportunity to play with a female pro and support such a worthy cause,” Mrs. Hauser says.

“This event has grown over the years and with the addition of a female professional, we hopefully can attract more women participants,” she says.

Each tournament team will be comprised of one professional golfer from the Western New York PGA Section and three amateurs. Proceeds from the field of 112 golfers will benefit the bereavement camp, say tournament organizers. In the first two years the Pro-Am For Kids has been held, “The tournament has raised $7,800 for the camp,” Mr. Stauffer notes.

The Foundation couldn’t be more pleased with how the charity tournament has evolved to benefit the camp. “We’re very appreciative of Kirk’s efforts to work with us on
this tournament. It’s a great way to support children in our community who are grieving over a loss,” says Nellie Wallace, the Foundation’s director of annual giving who’s also an avid golfer. She helped plan the first Pro-Am For Kids with Mr. Stauffer and Jeff Gabel, Bradford Regional Medical Center’s Plant Services director. The three have worked on the tournament every year since its inception.

Pine Acres and the Foundation joined efforts when Mr. Stauffer wanted to support a charity that would benefit children at a local camp. “It was easy for us to want to be involved with a charity like this that’s a win-win for everyone,” Mr. Stauffer says.

Anyone interested in registering or getting information about the camp should call the VNA at 814-362-7466. In 2005, Foundation officials announced the establishment of the Melissa A. Price McKean County VNA Children’s Bereavement Camp Named Fund, founded by the family of Miss Price. Contributions to the fund support the Helping Hands Retreat.

Heinz Pulls Mayo Ad

LONDON (AP) — Heinz Co. said viewer complaints prompted it to pull a British television advertisement for mayonnaise that showed two men kissing.

The ad for Heinz Deli Mayo depicted a kitchen scene involving two children, a father and a male deli cook with a New York accent, whom the children addressed as "Mum." At the end of the ad, the cook kisses the father as he leaves for work.

The Advertising Standards Authority said it received 202 complaints, some that said the advertisement was offensive, inappropriate and unsuitable for children.

Heinz said the ad was withdrawn because of "consumer feedback." Spokesman Nigel Dickie said Tuesday that the Pittsburgh-based company apologized if it had offended anyone.

Fox News host Bill O'Reilly complained about the advertisement on Friday during his show, "The O'Reilly Factor."

"I just want mayonnaise. I don't want guys kissing," he said.

British gay rights group Stonewall said it was shocked that Heinz had yanked what it called an "innocuous" ad and urged gay consumers to boycott the company.

The ad, which was launched on British television just over a week ago and was meant to run for five weeks, was taken off the air Friday, Heinz said in a statement released Monday.

The ad did not run in the U.S.

No Review of Molyneaux Conviction

A New York State appeals Court will not review the conviction of the former Portville teacher and Boy Scout leader convicted of molesting two boys he knew from school and scouting. 65-year-old James Molyneaux is serving up to 23 years in the Clinton County Correctional Facility in Dannemora for his conviction on sodomy and sexual abuse charges. The boys he sexually abused were 11 and 13 years old. He was convicted in 2005.

AKtion Club Starting in Bradford

Three local groups are starting a service club for adults living with disabilities.

The Kiwanis Club of Bradford, Bradford Area High School Key Club and Evergreen Elm Inc. are chartering an AKtion Club, which is part of the Kiwanis family of organizations.

An information session will be held at 6:30 p.m. July 1 at the Bradford Area Public Library for those interested in joining the Bradford AKtion Club. Friends and family members are welcome to attend the meeting along with potential members.

AKtion clubs are the newest Kiwanis International-sponsored organization. Their mission is to provide disabled adults an opportunity to develop initiative and leadership skills, to serve their community, to be integrated into society and to demonstrate the dignity and value of citizens living with disabilities.
“This will be a great opportunity for adults with disabilities to socialize and give back to the community,” said Garry Pugrant, executive director of Evergreen Elm.

Although sponsored by the Kiwanis Club, the AKtion Club will have its own meetings, governance and service projects.

“I can’t wait until we get this club off the ground,” said Kiwanis president Kimberly Weinberg.

“When I talk to Kiwanians from around the state whose clubs sponsor AKtion Clubs, they light up when they talk about this club. They always mention how much AKtion contributes to both their Kiwanis club and their community.”

Paula Vecellio will be the Kiwanis Club liaison to AKtion, and Sue Florentine will serve as the staff support from Evergreen Elm.

“The AKtion Club is going to give those with disabilities an organized club of their own and the satisfaction of helping others and giving back to the community,” Florentine said.

Vecellio noted that the club will develop members’ leadership skills.

“The AKtion club will provide a wonderful opportunity for its members to exhibit the many abilities they already possess and to further develop their abilities to benefit themselves and Bradford,” she said.

Sample service projects for the club include park beautification, food drives, nursing home visitations and assisting the Kiwanis and Key clubs with their service projects.

AKtion clubs began in 1987 in Florida, where the first club was organized in Putnam County. The idea spread throughout Florida Kiwanis clubs by word of mouth, and AKtion Clubs became an official sponsored program of Kiwanis International in 2000.

For more information, contact Weinberg at (814)362-1866 or kmw61@pitt.edu or Vecellio at 362-6853 or pmvecellio@evergreenelm.org.

Beacon Light Therapists to Present at Conference in Harrisburg

Six therapists from Beacon Light Behavioral Health Systems will be presenting at the upcoming 56th Annual North American Society of Adlerian Psychology (NASAP) Conference in Harrisburg, PA June 26-29. The group will be presenting “A Multifaceted Approach to Adlerian Sandtray Supervision” as part of the conference. The workshop will present experienced supervisors with detailed training on the use of sandtray therapy in Adlerian supervision via a panel presentation of a clinical supervision group and case demonstrations. Participants will learn how to incorporate sandtray into an Adlerian approach to clinical supervision and will learn, through a panel discussion of clinical supervisees, the practical applications of using sandtray in Adlerian supervision. Jennifer South, Kimberly Holt, Debra Kohler, Robert Eddy, Aimee Kaple and Shery Barker, all master’s level mental health therapists in Beacon Light’s residential treatment program will serve as facilitators of the session, along with Ken McCurdy, Ph.D. More information regarding the conference can be obtained by visiting alfredadler.org.

Alleged Milita Member Back in Jail

A Clearfield County man who police say taught undercover officers how to make homemade grenades is back in jail and will remain there until trial. Sixty-year-old Bradley Kahle was among several people arrested by federal authorities in a weapons raid earlier this month. He was the only defendant granted bond, but authorities say he violated conditions by having an explosive in his home. Authorities say Kahle told undercover agents he hoped Sen. Hillary Clinton or Sen. Barack Obama would be killed if they were elected president, and that he would shoot judicial and law enforcement officials if he became terminally ill.

Woman Sentenced for Fatal Crash

A Tioga County woman will spend a year in jail for letting a 15-year-old girl drive her car and cause a fatal crash. In December of 2006 Nicole Oakley let the 15-year-old unlicensed driver drive her car, which she crashed in Charleston Township and killed a passenger. Oakley pleaded guilty earlier this year to vehicular homicide and reckless endangerment.

Olean Policeman 'Relieved of Duties'

An Olean City Police officer who was charged with driving while intoxicated following a Friday night crash on North Union Street has been relieved of his duties pending resolution of the matter. 43-year-old Thomas Deckman is using his earned leave, according to Mayor David Carucci. Deckman is scheduled to appear in City Court on July 8. This is the second time in four years he's been charged with DWI.

Chickens Cause Highway Closure

A tractor-trailer hauling live chickens crashed near Harrisburg Monday afternoon in an accident that closed the northbound lanes of Interstate 81 and backed up traffic on the highway for several miles.

State police said about 9,500 chickens were on the trailer, which belonged to Little Rock Farms in Ontario, Canada. About half of the birds were killed. Charges are expected against the truck driver.

Watch the vidoe HERE.

From Congressman Peterson:

SUPPORT THE PETERSON AMENDMENT TO INCREASE DOMESTIC ENERGY PRODUCTION


The Peterson amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill would modify the 27-year old Congressional Moratorium preventing responsible, environmentally friendly, offshore oil and natural gas exploration. As a result of the congressional decree, it is currently illegal to produce American oil and natural gas on 85% of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). By harvesting this offshore energy, the price at the pump will stabilize and eventually decline. Contact your Representative and Senators and demand that they support responsible offshore energy production. Below is a compilation of recent media attention and links to Speaker Pelosi's Office and to House Appropriations Committee Members. Contact Speaker Pelosi and the Appropriations Committee and demand that the Interior Appropriations bill be scheduled for consideration.

Thanks for your continued support,
John E. Peterson
Member of Congress

Call Speaker Pelosi and demand action!

Call Members of the House Appropriations Committee and demand action!

Selected news articles, public opinion polls, TV clips, and radio clips on offshore energy production

Facts, figures and charts

LiveLine -- Tuesday, June 24

Today on the LiveLine we'll be talking with Elm Street Program Interns Rachel Ense and Kara Smith, along with Elm Street Manager Lisa Campiogani, about the Community Garden and more.

Besides all the renovations, clean-ups and other improvements in the program area, we can't mention the Elm Street Program Area without mentioning the Mastercraft All-American Soap Box Derby. What a great event for a section of town that's in the beginning stages of revitalization!

Monday, June 23, 2008

Zippo Teams Up With Lionsgate

Zippo Manufacturing supplied period lighters and advertising signs for the TV series "Mad Men" to help convey how universal smoking was in 1960, when the series is based. That led Lionsgate Home Entertainment to design a box for the first season DVD set shaped like a Zippo lighter. And that led Zippo to bring out two lighters with “Mad Men” logos, to be sold online and at the Zippo/Case Visitors Center.

Video From the Derby

Women's Air Race Classic

Venango Regional Airport is one of nine airports across the country to host the women’s 32nd Annual Air Race Classic (ARC). The racers will begin in Bozeman, Montana, on June 24 and end in Mansfield, Massachusetts, on June 27. This is the first year in the 31 years of the ARC that Venango Regional has been on the route.

O. C. Bell, Airport Manager, is the Stop Chair; Tom Brennan, Owner of Tom’s Aircraft Services and KB Aviation Flight School, will be the Head Timer.

The racers will land at airports along the way for fuel, food, and such. O. C. Bell stated, “Venango Regional anticipates 33 airplanes, and the first may make it here by Tuesday evening. The race ends Friday, so the last day we will probably see any racers will be Friday morning.” Although exact stopping times for the planes are unknown, aviation enthusiasts and other local residents interested in having an opportunity to greet and cheer-on the pilots are encouraged to stop at the airport whenever convenient.

Seventy-two women pilots of all ages will be participating in this event. They come from all across the United States and Canada and from all walks of life, including a 90-year-old woman from Phoenix, AZ, who has participated in 24 of these races. In addition to an Air Race Classic Award, cash awards for pilot and co-pilot range from $350 for tenth place to $5,000 for first place.

Air Race Classic, Inc., headquartered in Alva, Florida, is directed by an all-woman volunteer board of directors and many volunteers who devote countless hours to sponsoring and planning these annual races. More information about this event and Air Race Classic, Inc. can be found at Air Race Classic.

Miniature Horses in Meadville


Meadville, PA- The Tri-State Miniature Horse Club of Northwest PA and Northeast Ohio is having their Annual Miniature Horse Show June 28th and 29th at the Crawford County Fairgrounds, Meadville PA.

The weekend will start with an American Miniature Horse Registry sanctioned show on Saturday and will end with an American Miniature Horse Association (AMHA) sanctioned show on Sunday. Each day will be full of classes that will allow exhibitors to show their horses and earn nationally recognized points. The classes include halter, performance and driving classes. The halter classes judge the horse’s confirmation while the performance and driving classes are judged on the horse’s (and handler’s) ability to maneuver through obstacles and pull a pleasure cart. Jumping gets exciting as the jumps are raised until a champion is placed; the miniatures really enjoy this one on one competition as the height builds and really put on a show with their handlers trying to catch their own breath.

The World’s finest and smallest horses (AMHA Horses must measure 34’’ and under) will compete in all of the classes vying for points to qualify to attend “THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS” held in Ft.Worth Texas later this fall.

What makes the miniature horse “the horse for everyone”? One of the attractions is that the very young and the not so young can handle and enjoy these horses without the fear of injury.

In addition to the above described classes, costume class will also be offered for the exhibitors. This class allows the exhibitors to put themselves and their horses in costume to compete for the top prize. Many exhibitors become very creative with this class and it becomes one of the spectator’s favorites. Come cheer your favorite on.

The show will be held rain or shine as there is an indoor facility. Stalls are available for the horses and showing off of the trailer is permitted. Spectators are welcomed. There will be camping hookups and food concessions on the grounds.

Save Rim Rock.com

A coalition of groups, and private citizens who call themselves "Friends of Rim Rock" have started a new Web site. Some of our members are from the groups: the Allegheny Defense Project, Allegheny Outdoor Adventure Group, and the Tionesta Snowmobile Group. And "regular people" who want to help save Rim Rock from the proposed oil and gas drilling, so future generations can enjoy is as many in the past have.

Save Rim Rock.

Archaeological Excavation on ANF

Marienville, Pa. – The public and media are invited to an Open House at the Clarion River Archaeological Study Program and Field School on Friday, June 27, 2008, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The excavation is being led by Dr. Susan Prezzano of Clarion University of Pennsylvania (CUP) in cooperation with the Marienville Ranger District of the Allegheny National Forest (NF). Visitors will have an opportunity to watch the excavations in progress, learn about the history of this site, and see some of the artifacts already discovered at this site.

Directions to the site: From Marienville, travel southeast on Loleta Road for about 6 miles. Turn south onto Millstone Road (gravel). At the end of Millstone Road, continue straight onto River Road (SR 2006). The site is located at a sharp bend on River Road. There is limited parking in a gravel lot. Wear sturdy shoes or boots, and long pants, as poison ivy is in the area.

Clarion University has conducted several years of excavations in cooperation with the Allegheny NF at various sites. This is the first season of archaeological excavations at this site. Participants in the field school include advanced undergraduates, undergraduates, and area high school students taking part in a new program which combines field experience in archaeology with a week of instruction in various sciences taught at CUP. Students receive first hand instruction in proper excavation techniques and documentation of finds.

The project is primarily supported by a Title III Secure Rural Schools grant from Elk County, with additional assistance from the Forest County Conservation District, Stackpole-Hall Foundation, Eastern National Forests Interpretive Association, Millstone Township, and Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Additional information is available from Erin Knolles, VISTA Volunteer, at 814-927-5739, or Amanda Glaz, Marienville Ranger District Archaeologist, at 814-927-5756.

Erin Howard Faces Escape Charge

The Corry woman accused of killing her six-year-old son in a drunk driving crash now faces an escape charge. 26-year-old Erin Howard was released from prison Saturday to attend the funeralof her son in Ohio. But instead of returning to the Erie County Prison after the funeral, she allegedly went to a bar. Howard faces a charge of escape after she violated the terms of her furlough from the Erie County Prison. She is being held in Hamilton, Ohio. If she waives extradition, she will be returned to the Erie County Prison to face prosecution. Howard is accused of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the June 14 death of her 6-year-old son, Samuel Carpenter.

Living History Encampment
at Irwin Run in Elk County

Marienville, Pa. – The Forest Service (FS), in partnership with the National Park Service (NPS), will hold a Living History Encampment at Campsite 23 (near Irwin Run Canoe Launch) on the Clarion River on June 28 and 29, a Saturday and Sunday. The encampment will focus on the French and Indian War period of 1750 to 1760 and will offer education in Native and French cultures involved in the American fur trade of the period. Costumed interpreters from both the NPS and the FS will present demonstrations on musket use, swivel gun use, fur trading, and cooking. The encampment will open at 9:00 a.m. and close at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, and at 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Sunday. This encampment is open and free to the public; come mingle and share our fire.

Swivel gun demonstrations will be held on Sunday only. A swivel gun is a half-pound artillery piece easily transported and used mostly for mounting to the gunwale of small watercraft including large canoes. The schedule may be subject to change due to inclement weather. Irwin Run is three (3) miles east of Hallton on State Route 3002 (also called the Spring Creek or Hallton Township Road) and 14 miles west of Ridgway. The Irwin Run Canoe Launch is on the Clarion River 17 miles west of Ridgway if arriving by canoe.

Due to the use of Campsite 23 at Irwin Run Canoe Launch by the Forest Service, Campsite 23 will be closed at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, June 26, and will reopen after 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 29. Campsite 23 will be posted closed to public use during this timeframe.

Saturday: Musket demonstrations at 10:00 a.m., 12:00 noon, and 2:00 p.m.
Fur trade presentations at 11:00 a.m., and 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
Cooking demonstrations ongoing throughout the day.

Sunday: Musket demonstrations at 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Swivel gun demonstrations at 11:00 a.m., and 1:00 and 2:00 p.m.

For additional information, please contact Herb Clevenger of the Marienville Ranger District at 814/927-6628.

R.I.P George Carlin

LOS ANGELES, June 23 (UPI) -- U.S. comedian and social commentator George Carlin has died from heart failure in California, his publicist said.



"Entertainment Tonight" reported Carlin, 71, died Sunday night at Saint John's Hospital in Santa Monica.

He had been the victim of several heart attacks and had a history of heart disease, "ET" online reported. He went to the hospital Sunday afternoon complaining of heart problems.

Carlin was famous for his controversial comedy routine "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television."

Carlin was the host of the premiere episode of "Saturday Night Live" in 1975 and later starred in numerous HBO comedy specials. He also appeared in the big-screen comedies "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure," "Dogma" and "Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back."

Carlin, the author of the bestselling book "Brain Droppings," was to receive the John F. Kennedy Center's Mark Twain Prize for American Humor this fall.

"The world is a big theater-in-the round as far as I'm concerned, and I'd love to watch it spin itself into oblivion," Carlin told Playboy magazine in 2005. "Tune in and watch the human adventure.... That's what I want heaven to be."

People.com said Carlin is survived by his wife, Sally Wade, and daughter, Kelly Carlin McCall.

Sunday, June 22, 2008

Energy Costs Push Interest
In Gas Reserves

BY GARRY LENTON
Of The Patriot-News

For thousands of years, a vast supply of natural gas lay trapped far below the surface in Pennsylvania. But it was too deep, and too costly to get to.

Until now.

New technology, coupled with rising prices for the gas, triggered a gas rush in Pennsylvania that is putting cash in landowners' pockets and could create thousands of jobs.

For the complete story, go to the Harrisburg Patriot-News

Borough May Ban Couches

STROUDSBURG, Pa. (AP) — A northeastern Pennsylvania borough is considering an ordinance that would ban couches on front porches and lawns. Stroudsburg officials say the ban would apply to upholstered furniture that is manufactured primarily for indoor use. Code enforcement officer Jeff Wilkins says the fire department is concerned about safety hazards. But he says the borough is thinking about aesthetics, too. A public hearing is set to be held on the ordinance next month. Some residents say the idea is ridiculous.

Rhodes Leaving Kane Hospital

Kane Community Hospital's C-E-O Gary Rhodes has been selected as the new C-E-O of Calais Regional Hospital in Maine. Rhodes has served as the CEO in Kane for the past 11 years. Before that, he served four years as the chief operating officer of Kane Community Hospital. No word yet on who will replace Rhodes.

DA: Man Impregnated 12-Year-Old

An Altoona man is being accused of raping and impregnating a 12-year-old girl. Blair County District Attorney Richard Consiglio says 20-year-old Curtis Adrian Walk has been charged with 10 counts, including rape. Details in the case have been sealed due to the girl's age. In December, Children and Youth Services alerted police to the 12-year-old's pregnancy. Police used a search warrant to obtain blood from Walk to try to establish the identity of the baby's father. Walk was already in the Blair County Jail after being charged in February with the sexual assault of a 14-year-old girl. Walk has also recently been charged with drug offenses.

Construction, Construction
And More Construction

Some people tell us they're upset about the removal of the tree in front of the Bradford Family YMCA at the corner of Kennedy and Boylston streets.




Well, let's concentrate on the positive, shall we? Several new trees have been planted on Boylston Street -- with more to come -- in Bradford's Streetscape Project. We also have new sidewalks on Boylston and part of Kennedy Street, with more renovation work going on there, too. In my opinion, it's going to look beautiful when it's finished. It's already a vast improvement. (Oh, look! Another Jeep.)

For those of you who haven't been driving near Main Street lately -- or have been driving there and have been wondering what's going on -- this is why you can't drive east on Main from Davis to High streets.

The traffic pattern will remain in place until further notice, so please don't be like the driver who ignored the fact that there are barriers in the "left turn" lane on Davis Street and tried to turn left anyway and caused a bit of a traffic jam Saturday afternoon.

And we haven't heard much about this lately but work is continuing at Parkway Field.

Jeepers Creepers!


This driver heads out on the third day of the 11th annual Penn's Woods Jeep Jamboree Sunday ...


... while the drivers of these Jeeps eat breakfast before heading back out onto the trails. The Jamboree is an off-road adventure weekend that brings together the outdoors, down-to-earth people and their Jeep 4x4s. Participants will travel through the Allegheny Highlands on trails appropriate for their experience level

Thanks to the Drivers & Directors!

Soap Box Derby Drivers:


Gavin Linane, Andy Paul, Evan Pecora, Jack Pecora, Harvey Rose, Brice Skaggs, Kody Taylor, Garrett Smith, Kaitlynne Smith, Tyler Smith, Tim Taylor, Blake Wian, Madi Williams

And thanks to the Bradford, Pennsylvania, Mastercraft All American Soap Box Derby Board of Directors for bringing the derby back to Bradford:

David Johe
Dick Keltz
Dick Linane
Tina Linane
Christine Mangione
Joe Mangione
Jay Pecora
Marilyn Sherwood
Mike Shine
Dennis Smith
Dave Williams
Steve Feldman

And thanks to everyone who showed up to support the event!