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Saturday, October 24, 2009

LiveLine Schedule for the Week of
October 26, 2009

Monday: Our series on United Way funded agencies continues with Amy Pierce, director of the Bradford YWCA

Tuesday: Our series on Domestic Violence Awareness Month concludes with Safety Issues

Wednesday: Michelle McCann, president of the Kiwanis Club of Bradford

Thursday: Jeff Hendryx, Reiki Master Practitioner http://fullcirclereiki.com/testimonials.html


Remember you can hear the LiveLine live online at 12:40 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Chautauqua County Unveils New
Dining Out Program for Seniors

Cassadaga, NY -- An innovative program that allows Chautauqua County seniors to have a delicious and nutritious meal at a variety of local restaurants was unveiled Thursday by Chautauqua County Executive Gregory J. Edwards.

The Senior Restaurant Dining Program is a partnership between the Chautauqua County Office for the Aging (OFA) and local restaurants. Grandma's Family Kitchen in Cassadaga hosted the program's announcement.

"This program offers Senior Citizens a unique opportunity to remain connected to their family, community and home by allowing them to eat what they want, when they want in local area restaurants," Edwards said.

Edwards worked with OFA Director Dr. Mary Ann Spanos and her staff to create the Senior Restaurant Dining Program as a means to address the declining numbers of people using County sponsored Meal Sites.

Under the new program, seniors can obtain tickets from the OFA Office for a donation of $3. Seniors can then go out to eat at one of the participating restaurants, present that ticket to the wait staff prior to paying for their meal.

Edwards said this innovative program seeks to increase Senior Citizens' opportunities for socialization and community activity, ensures nutritional needs are met and provides for stronger bonds between local business and the seniors in their community.

"We want seniors to be able to go where they would naturally congregate and where they would naturally go to have a good meal," Spanos said. "This is a great opportunity for our seniors to get out and gather with our younger Chautauqua County residents."

The OFA will provide a list of restaurants who have agreed to be pilot sites.

Spanos said her office will supply participating restaurants with signage and marketing materials for their businesses. OFA will also provide training to staff regarding program guidelines and assistance with billing as needed.

"This is a great opportunity for local restaurants to participate in a valuable community service to our area's elderly population," Edwards said. "It's also a great way for these restaurants and local businesses to promote themselves, and should act as our own, local stimulus package for our community."

For more information about the program or to become involved, please contact OFA Nutrition Coordinator, Becky Blum at 661-7471, 753-4471, or 363-4471.

e-mail from Joel Keefer

Clearfield County Firefighter Dies

A Clearfield County firefighter died in the line of duty early Saturday morning.

41-year-old Lt. Roy Westover was among the firefighters battling a blaze at an abandoned vacant structure.

While on the scene, Westover reported that he did not feel well. Paramedics who were already on the scene started treatment and transported him to Miners Hospital. At the hospital, Westover apparently had a heart attack and died.

Westover is survived by three teenage sons, two of whom are junior firefighters; his parents; and a number of brothers and sisters.

State police are investigating the fire, which is being treated as suspicious because there have been other suspicious fires in the area since April.

http://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/fullstory.php?95110

Guilty Plea in Bar Fight Death

A Tidioute man charged with killing another man in a fight outside a bar in May has pleaded guilty to simple assault.

25-year-old Brandon Bynum was scheduled to go on trial Monday for killing 37-year-old Troy McFarland. He was charged with criminal homicide and simple assault.

District Attorney Ross McKeirnan said his office felt they didn't have proof of intent to support the homicide charge.

Bynum admitted that he hit McFarland in the face and knocked him to the ground.

McFarland's head hit the ground and his skull was fractured. He died at the scene.

Bynum faces up to two years in prison when he's sentenced on December 4.

Toddler's Death Ruled Homicide

The death of a 2-year-old Jamestown boy has been ruled homicide.

District Attorney David Foley says the ruling was made after receiving the full autopsy report on Auston Morales, but he can't release any further information at this time.

Auston died on October 17 at Women and Children's Hospital in Buffalo, a day after being found unresponsive at his home. His father, 31-year-old Agustin Morales, was taken into custody a short time later on an active warrant charging him with endangering the welfare of a child, which is unrelated to the child's death and stems from a previous incident.

Agustin Morales is still in the Chautauqua County Jail on the warrant and is being held in lieu of $30,000 bail.

No one has been charged yet with Auston's death.

JPD

Deputies: Man Punched Girlfriend,
Held Knife to Brother's Throat

A Portland, New York, man is accused of punching his girlfriend and threatening to kill his brother.

Chautauqua County Sheriff's deputies say 22-year-old Kevin Lack punched Christena LaVoice in the face. She ran behind his brother, Jason Lack, for protection. Lack then allegedly grabbed a knife, placed it to his brother's throat and threatened to kill him. He eventually dropped the knife and punched his brother in the face and head.

When deputies arrived on the scene, Kevin Lack ran out the back door of the home and into the woods. When deputies found him he was arrested without incident. He was arraigned on charges of menacing and harassment and sent to Chautauqua County Jail.

e-mail from Chautauqua County Sheriff's Department

Man Charged with Having Sexual Contact with 12-Year-Old Boy

A Barto, PA, man is accused of having sexual contact with a boy four times in a camper trailer in Keating Township, Potter County.

State police say 62-year-old Richard Rinehart Sr. had the contact with the in November and December of last year when he was 12 years old. The other two alleged incidents happened earlier this month. The boy is now 13.

Rinehart was charged with involuntary deviate sexual intercourse and arraigned by District Judge Delores Bristol, who set bail at $150,000. He's in Potter Jail.

fax from Coudersport-based state police

Comedy Night Sells Out

The Bradford Township Volunteer Fire Department "Comedy Night" has sold out for tonight, according to BTVFD Chief Dan Burkhouse.

call from Dan Burkhouse

Live from the Sportsman's Outlet

Frank Williams chats with Ben Wentworth of The Sportsman's Outlet during The HERO's live broadcast from the Chestnut Street store.


Isaac gives it his best shot in the Kids Casting Contest, organized by Tom Means. The Bradford High Soccer Boosters are there, too, selling hot dogs, hamburgers, chili and potato soup.

Frank Williams shows off this pink fishing pole and says it's perfect for that female in your life who loves fishing. Frank has decided he doesn't want a new fishing pole for Christmas (but I'm sure he wouldn't send it back if you gave him one). Instead, he wants a fishing kayak. Just so ya know.

SPCA Open House

Chloe's Mom & Dad look over some of the items in the McKean County SPCA silent auction, while Chloe looks at some of the items for sale (and probably wonders if they're going to buy her a nice, new Christmas outfit.)


These Shelties are just two of the many four-legged visitors to the open house, which is going on until 3 p.m. The SPCA is also holding a rabies clinic until 3 p.m. It's only $5 per cat or dog.

You think Wade Aiken's job as a photographer for The Bradford Era is easy? Well, it can be a little difficult when one of the subjects of his photo insists on not facing the right way. That's Humane Officer Tony Danias looking on.

Thanks to J&K Pets, Ott & McHenry Pharmacy, Northwest Savings Bank, Crescent Beer, Little Caeser's and W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Company for making our broadcast possible.

Around the Home
with Master Gardner Bob Harris

Video clips at Ustream

Stayed tuned for the news, sports, The Weekend Wrap and Ad Line.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Tom Tessena on Sports Forum



Bradford High track and cross country coach Tom Tessena was one of Frank's guests on Sports Forum today, and he talked about the dedication of the cross country course at GGB (pictured above).
Listen to Sports Forum by clicking here.

(photo by Frank Williams)

'Listening is an Act of Love' Author
to Visit Bona's on October 29

St. Bonaventure University’s First-Year Experience program and All Bonaventure Reads Committee will welcome author and journalist David Isay for a lecture at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, in the Reilly Center Arena.

Isay is author of “Listening Is An Act of Love,” the 2009 All Bonaventure Reads selection for incoming students.

“Listening” is a celebration of American life from the StoryCorps project, which travels around the country and allows everyday people to collect and record stories by interviewing friends and family who have something to share. At the end of each 40-minute interview, one copy of the audio is given to the participants, a second becomes part of an archive at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Excerpts of interviews are broadcast each Friday on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” program.

The “Listening” book is a compilation of a handful of StoryCorps’ most remarkable stories, which deal with family, work and struggle that paint a portrait of everyday American life.

The All Bonaventure Reads text is the cornerstone of the University 101 course for freshmen and the entire campus community was invited to read the book and participate in numerous events planned over the course of the fall semester.

“We are in the process of building an archive of stories about SBU. Each freshman is conducting an interview with someone connected to the University and inviting that person to tell his or her story. This is an exciting project, complementing the reading and discussion of the book,” said Nancy Casey, director of the First-Year Experience program.

“Students have offered thoughtful comments as to how ‘listening,’ in its myriad meanings, is a vital concept for college students to integrate into their collegiate experience,” added Jean Trevarton Ehman, chair of the All Bonaventure Reads Committee and director of the university’s Teaching and Learning Center.

Isay will arrive on campus at 2:30 p.m. Thursday for a tour with freshman class officers, followed by an informal get-together of University 101 instructors, All Bonaventure Reads Committee, FYE Council and some students. Selected freshmen will have dinner with Isay, and the evening will conclude with the talk.

Isay founded StoryCorps in 2003. He is the recipient of multiple awards in radio and journalism; he has received two Peabodys for broadcast journalism and won the Livingston Award and the Society of Professional Journalism prize for his documentary “Ghetto Life 101,” which chronicles hardships of life in the inner city.

Thursday’s talk is free and open to the public.

e-mail from Tom Missel, SBU

Bolivar Drive

Kelly Laird, owner of the Lighthouse Restaurant, our brand new sponsor, just called to let us know that Bolivar Drive is open.

Apparently, PennDOT has finished painting the Route 219 bridges.

Immunization Records Needed for
Children at BRMC Flu Clinics

Parents must bring immunization records for their children who will be receiving an H1N1 flu vaccination at free clinics being held Monday and Tuesday, from noon to 6 p.m. both days, in the Outpatient Services Center lobby at Bradford Regional Medical Center, say hospital officials.

Question and Comment

A couple of people e-mailed me today and asked if I'll still be posting LiveLines, City Council meetings and other audio clips on the blog now that we're streaming. Well, our first audio/video was posted in March of 2008 so there's no reason to stop now. (That doesn't include the Buzz Week in Review, which we started in February of 2008). I know some people can't listen live, and I like to be able to give them a chance to listen at their leisure. For people who don't know, you can also go to WESB.com to hear the Noon and 6 p.m. newscasts at your leisure.

My comment is to the nice gentleman who said the blog is an excellent "companion" to our station because he gets to know a little more about me, Scott, Frank, Igor and what's happening at the station. Thank you! It's always nice to be appreciated.

Video clips at Ustream

PGC: Pair Grew Pot on State Land

HARRISBURG – Pennsylvania Game Commission Southwest Regional Director R. Matthew Hough announced that charges recently were filed against two individuals for growing marijuana on State Game Land 117 in Smith Township, Washington County.

On June 7, Washington County Wildlife Conservation Officer (WCO) Daniel Sitler and Deputy WCO James Lorch, while on routine patrol on SGL 117, encountered two individuals who were acting suspicious during the brief conversation.

“After this odd exchange, we decided to try and determine what they had been doing while visiting SGL 117,” WCO Sitler said. “We back-tracked where they had been and soon discovered 21 marijuana plants planted in thick vegetation along a Game Commission food plot.”

Following this discovery, the officers used video surveillance technology to establish the connection between the suspected individuals and the marijuana plants.

“The Game Commission has a long history and tradition of passing down our investigative techniques from one generation of Wildlife Conservation Officers to the next through our training structure,” said Scott W. Tomlinson, Game Commission Southwest Region Law Enforcement Supervisor. “In recent years, we’ve been able to incorporate new technologies, such as the use of newly-developed surveillance equipment, to our list of tools used to solve these types of crimes.

“As similar sites have been known to be booby-trapped, this type of activity poses a safety threat to both the public that use our State Game Lands, and agency employees, such as Food and Cover Corps workers, who work there on a daily basis developing food plots and wildlife habitat.”

After consulting the Washington County District Attorney’s office and the Washington County Drug Task Force, WCO Sitler filed charges against Joshua M. Morrissey, 35, of Cuddy, and Robert N. Hoff, 32, of Cannonsburg. Arrest warrants were issued for these defendants charging them with felony counts under Title 35 (The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, Section 780-113 (a) 30) for the manufacture, delivery, possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance, and (Section 780-113 (a) 16) possession of a controlled substance.

Additionally, WCO Sitler filed charges under Title 34 (Game and Wildlife Code) the unlawful planting of marijuana on State Game Lands.

All charges were filed before District Judge Gary Havelka, of Burgettstown.

Both Morrissey and Hoff were arraigned and lodged in the Washington County prison pending the posting of bond. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled for Oct. 29, on all charges.

Pictured, on Sept. 4, a team of Game Commission officers and employees removed 21 marijuana plants from SGL 117 in Washington County. Those participating in the removal were: Kneeling left to right: WCO Seth Mesoras (Westmoreland County), WCO Richard Joyce (Washington County), WCO Dan Sitler (Washington County), WCO Gary Fujak (Allegheny County); and Standing left to right: IES Tom Fazi (SWRO), LMGS Doug Dunkerley, WCO Rod Burns (Greene County), WCO Randy Crago (Greene County), LES Scott Tomlinson (SWRO), WCO Matt Kramer (Beaver County), WCO Beth Fife (Allegheny County).
(PGC Photo)

e-mail from the game commission

Tops Tailgate at Home Winner #2

Congratulations to Dean Meacham of Bradford and his granddaughter -- this week's winners of a $100 gift card from Tops in the Tailgate at Home contest. What are they doing with the winnings? Having a tea party.

You still have two more chances to win a $100 gift card. Here's where you can find all the details.
http://www.wbrrfm.com/tailgate.html

You Asked for It ...

You got it. We're streaming

Video clips at Ustream

You can hear:
The Morning Buzz* 6 to 9:35 a.m.
Ad Line 9:35 to 10 a.m. a.m.
Midday Magazine 12 to 1:06 p.m.
Ameriprise Financial Business Briefs 5:55 p.m.
The WESB News Review 6 p.m.

Today's LiveLine/Sports Forum guests are Nancy Chesnut, director of the YWCA Victims Resource Center; Tom Tessena, Bradford High Track and Cross Country Coach; and John Place and Paul Pfaff of the Big 30 Committee.

Thanks to our Midday Magazine sponsors: Bill Chapman of Ameriprise Financial; Bradford Regional Medical Center (health report); Fairway Ford Lincoln Mercury (Bradford Area Chamber of Commerce Community Calendar); and Tops Friendly Markets (Mike Cejka's weather forecast).

*We're not streaming music yet because of licensing issues that we're working out, and we want to be legal. But you can still hear local news, sports, local birthdays, the community calendar and Scott and Frank's "witty banter."

Personally, I think this is just the next step in Scott's plan for world domination.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

PA Milk Prices Going Up

The Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board is temporarily raising the minimum price of milk across the state to help struggling dairy farmers.

That means that from November 1 through December 31 consumers will pay about 4 cents more a gallon for milk.

Farmers get an extra 50 cents, or $2.65 per 100 pounds of milk (11.6 gallons).

“Farmers have been struggling with lower than expected prices for the milk they produce. By increasing the premium, the PMMB recognized that quick action needed to be taken to account for the extended period of low milk prices,” said Pennsylvania Farm Bureau President Carl T. Shaffer.

Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.

Swim Team Opens Season Saturday

The Pitt-Bradford women's and men's swim team will open their 2009-10 season with the Pitt-Bradford Panther Relays on Saturday at 1 p.m.

Penn State Altoona, Penn State Behrend, Notre Dame College of Ohio and Bethany College from West Virginia will be the opponents.

The Pitt-Bradford swim team is coached by Ed Bahan and assisted by Pam Digel.

"Our kids have been training hard for this season," said Bahan. "They've swum over 55 miles, which is the equivalent of the width of Lake Erie."

There is no admission charge for the meet.

Keystone Exams Approved

The Independent Regulatory Review Commission voted 4-1 today to approve the Keystone Exams, although the new rules allow local school boards to substitute their own alternatives.

The regulations must undergo a technical review by the attorney general's office, but they're expected to be published and become law in about two months.

If the federal government gives its approval, the Keystone Exams will replace the 11th grade PSSAs.

School districts can develop their own assessments as long as they meet certain standards. They can also allow students to substitute advanced placement or International Baccalaureate exams if the content is similar to the Keystones.

From the Independent Regulatory Review Commission

Six New Full-Time Faculty at UPB

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford announces the addition of six full-time faculty members for the 2009-10 academic year.

They are Claudine M. Cooper, instructor of hospitality management; Larry W. Kerns, visiting instructor of petroleum engineering; Dr. John C. Levey, assistant professor of music; Dr. Sooh-Rhee Ryu, visiting assistant professor of political science; Dr. Jesse Steinberg, assistant professor of philosophy; and D. Reece Wilson, assistant professor of education.

Cooper holds a master of science degree in hospitality and tourism from the University of Wisconsin – Stout. She has 22 years’ experience in hospitality, international banking and technology as well as four years in teaching college-level hospitality and business programs. She is a past president of the Minnesota chapter of the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International.

Kerns, a trained engineer, has 28 years’ experience in the petroleum industry as a petroleum engineer, lab instructor at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology’s petroleum engineering department and as a petroleum technology instructor. Before coming to Pitt-Bradford, Kerns was a field engineer for a southeastern Ohio independent producer with 500 wells and 200 miles of pipeline.

Levey earned his doctoral degree in composition and music theory from the University of Michigan. In addition to serving as a graduate student instructor at Michigan, Levey has taught music theory for the Michigan Youth Ensembles program and has experience in conducting and music technology. He is also a proficient keyboardist. In addition to teaching at Pitt-Bradford, Levey conducts the College-Community Choir.

Ryu earned her doctoral degree in political science from the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, where she was both an adjunct instructor and graduate instructor. Her primary teaching and research interests are in international relations and comparative politics with particular focus upon the politics and economics of developing countries. At Pitt-Bradford, she teaches Introduction to International Affairs, World Politics and American Foreign Relations.

Steinberg earned his doctoral degree in philosophy at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His areas of specialty are metaphysics, philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. Before coming to Pitt-Bradford, he taught at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; University of California, Riverside; Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; University of California, Los Angeles; and University of California, Santa Barbara.

Wilson holds a master of science degree in education from Clarion University of Pennsylvania and is a doctoral student in reading education at the University of Pittsburgh. He is certified to teach elementary education in Pennsylvania and has taught first grade at St. Joseph Grade School in Lucinda and a pre-kindergarten class at Clarion’s Earl R. Siler Children’s Learning Complex, where he later became director. He has also taught education classes at Clarion. He teaches early child development at Pitt-Bradford.

Obituary
Elizabeth Sheeley

Elizabeth M. Sheeley, 93, formerly of 282 East Main St. passed away Tuesday, October 20th, 2009 at the Bradford Ecumenical Home.

Born January 5, 1916, in Bradford, she was a daughter of the late Harry T. and Elsie (Cowan) Mills.

On June 24, 1939 in Eldred, she married Max H. Sheeley who died on June 1, 1987.

She was a 1934 graduate of Bradford High School, attended Mansfield College, and graduated from Clarion College.

She worked as a teacher at Marienville and Limestone School Districts.

She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church, the Eastern Star, and the Current Events Club.

Surviving are two sons: Thomas (Diane) Sheeley, and Richard (Barb) Sheeley all of Bradford, two grandsons: Mark Sheeley, and David Sheeley both of Bradford and one nephew Bob Mansfield of Vallejo, CA.

At the family's request there will be no visitation. Private funeral services will be held at the convenience of the family. Burial will be in McKean Memorial Park.

Memorials, if desired, may be made to the the First Presbyterian Church or a charity of the donors choice.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Hollenbeck-Cahill Funeral Homes, Inc.

On line condolences may be made at www.hollenbeckcahill.com

Cabot Fined $56,650

Cabot Oil and Gas has been fined $56,650 after reporting three chemical spills in Susquehanna County.

DEP is fining Cabot for violating the Clean Streams Law, Solid Waste Management Act and Oil and Gas Act.

Last week, DEP allowed the Houston-based company to resume fracking. The company was ordered to stop its operations after three spills of a liquid-gel lubricant within seven days.

gleaned from news release e-mailed from DEP

Flammable Blair Robes Recalled

Flammable women's robes sold by Blair Corporation of Warren are linked to nine deaths, and the company is expanding a recall to include more products imported from the Pakistani manufacturer.

Blair first recalled the robes in April after learning that three had caught on fire and one person suffered second degree burns. Later, the Consumer Product Safety Commission received reports of five deaths related to the robes. Since June, the agency has received reports of four more deaths.

The full-length women's chenille robes sold in Blair catalogs and at their stores in Warren and Grove City present a risk if exposed to open flame, the agency said.
The expanded recall includes more chenille robes and three other chenille products, all made by A-One Textile & Towel of Karachi, Pakistan.

For more information, go to http://www.blair.com/content.jsp?pageName=recall

Life in Prison for Parent Killer

A Brookville man who killed his parents will spend the rest of his life in prison.

Richard Reed pleaded guilty earlier this month to first-degree murder for killing Mary and John Reed in March of 2008. He was sentenced Wednesday in Jefferson County Court.

After shooting his parents, he attempted to flee to Canada but was stopped at the border, where he confessed to the crimes.

Arrests in Operation Diamond Drop

HARRISBURG — Attorney General Tom Corbett today announced that agents from the Attorney General’s Bureau of Narcotics Investigation, assisted by local police officers from across Erie County and the Pennsylvania State Police, are in the process of arresting 41 suspects linked to a nearly $5 million drug organization operating in and around Erie.

Corbett said the nearly 2-year long grand jury investigation, known as “Operation Diamond Drop,” used court-ordered wiretaps, undercover surveillance and controlled drug purchases to identify large-scale cocaine and marijuana traffickers in the region.

“Drug trafficking at this level is ‘big business’, including upper-level suppliers, mid-level distributers and street-level sales people,” Corbett said. “Our investigations focus on following the drugs and money to their source, allowing us to attack an entire drug distribution network when we make our arrests.”

Corbett said the chief figure charged today is Miguel Angel Burgos, 31, 9891 Holly Drive, Lake City, who allegedly used a store-front located at 10th and Ash Streets in Erie, along with various “stash houses” and other locations to conceal, repackage and distribute up to a kilo of cocaine per month. Burgos, who often used the name “Mark Diamond” during drug transactions, allegedly obtained drugs in bulk-quantities from suppliers in New York and New Jersey and bragged about earning more than $160,000 per month selling cocaine.

According to the grand jury, Miguel Burgos used his brother, Angel Ivan Burgos Jr, 32, 2522, German St., Erie, to assist in the distribution and delivery of drugs, along with the collection of payments from other dealers throughout the region.

Corbett said that several other Erie residents worked with the Burgos brothers in the distribution and sale of cocaine or marijuana to various other local dealers or drug users, including Howard Anthony Erhart, age 32.; Jose L. Rodriguez, age 34; Steven Randall Hoyt, age 29,; Charles A. Tangle Jr, age 24; Assiac Robles, age 32; and Jason Anthony Renzi, age 30, all from Erie.

Additionally, the grand jury recommended criminal charges against more than 30 other Erie area residents whose drug-related activities were identified during the course of the investigation. These suspects are accused of street-level sales of cocaine or marijuana, assisting in the delivery of drugs, or purchasing drugs from dealers allegedly linked to the Burgos organization.

Corbett said that search warrants and drug purchases conducted during the course of this investigation resulted in the seizure of approximately 50 ounces of cocaine, three ounces of marijuana, nearly $8,000 in cash and an assortment of prescription pills.

Corbett noted that this is an ongoing investigation, working to identify others in Erie who may have assisted with the sale and distribution of cocaine and marijuana, along with the out-of-state sources for these drugs.

The suspects will be prosecuted in Erie County by Senior Deputy Attorney General Douglas Wright of the Attorney General’s Drug Strike Force Section.

Corbett thanked the Erie County District Attorney’s Office, Pennsylvania State Police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and police departments from Erie City, Millcreek Township, Edinboro Borough, Lake City Borough, Girard Borough, Lawrence Park Township and Meadville City for their cooperation and assistance with this investigation.

A full list of defendants and the charges filed against them is included below:

Miguel Angel Burgos, 31, 9891 Holly Drive, Lake City, is charged with two counts each of participating in a corrupt organization, possession with intent to deliver cocaine and possession of cocaine, along with one count each of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, criminal use of a communications facility and dealing in the proceeds of unlawful activities.

Angel Ivan Burgos Jr., 32, 2522, German St., Erie, is charged with two counts each of participating in a corrupt organization, possession with intent to deliver cocaine and possession of cocaine, along with one count each of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, delivery of marijuana, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Howard Anthony Erhart, 32, 925 Powell Ave., Erie, is charged with two counts of participating in a corrupt organization, five counts of possession of cocaine, three counts of delivery of cocaine, two counts of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, along with one count each of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and criminal use of a communications facility.

Jose Luis Rodriguez, 34, 1228 Rankine Ave., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine and possession of cocaine.

Steven Randall Hoyt, 29, 328 West 2nd St., Erie, is charged with two counts of participating in a corrupt organization, three counts of possession of cocaine, two counts of delivery of cocaine and one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, possession of marijuana, possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and criminal use of a communications facility.

Charles A. Tangle Jr, 24, 1419 Custer Drive, Erie, is charged with two counts of participating in a corrupt organization, one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, six counts of delivery of cocaine, six counts of possession of cocaine and one count of criminal use of a communications facility.

Assiac Robles, 32, 918 Plum St., Erie, is charged with four counts each of delivery of cocaine and possession of cocaine, along with one count each of conspiracy to deliver cocaine, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Jason Anthony Renzi, 30, 2310 Emerson Ave., Erie, is charged with two counts of participating in a corrupt organization, one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, one count of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, 14 counts of delivery of cocaine, 15 counts of possession of cocaine and one count of criminal use of a communications facility.

David O. Bagnoni, 32, 555 West 31st St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Anthony Michael Belczyk, 30, 6954 West 5th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Angela Marie Cacchione, 28, 941 West 25th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Ashley Sue Cheeseman, 25, 1411 Mulberry Lane, Fairview, Erie County, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Justin D. Double, 29, 153 East 29th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Matthew Jacob Dubowski, 29, 1708 Granada Drive, Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Rodney Lashawn Eddy, 34, 1038 West 8th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, possession with intent to deliver marijuana, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Gerald Dennis Fachetti, 47, 425 Oregon Ave, Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine, possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Matthew L. Fox, 28, 1714 West 15th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine, possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Sean P. Freeland, 19, 3070 Haas Ave., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Peter H. Greene, 38, 10175 Ivoray Road, Cranesville, Erie County, is charged with one count each of possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Leroy Gerald Hall, Jr., 23, 956 West 18th Street, Erie, is charged with eight counts each of delivery of cocaine and possession of cocaine, along with one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine and one count of criminal use of a communications facility.

Germaine Jeffries, 29, 1706 Liberty St., Erie, is charged with seven counts each of delivery of cocaine and possession of cocaine, along with one count each of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Erin D. Johnson, 27, 402 Rondeau Drive, Erie, is charged with two counts of participating in a corrupt organization, along with one count each of possession of cocaine, possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Ricardo Lamberty Jr., 26, 626 East 23rd St., Erie, is charged with two counts each of delivery of cocaine and possession of cocaine, along with one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine.

William Andrew Lasky Jr., 46, 928 ½ West 11th St., Erie, is charged with two counts of possession of marijuana, along with one count each of delivery of marijuana, possession with intent to deliver marijuana, criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Tammy A. Little, 45, 6901 Water St., Fairview, Erie County, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Isaac Grant Nolan, 32, 3121 Plum St., Erie, is charged with two counts of delivery of cocaine, two counts of possession of cocaine, one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine and one count of criminal use of a communications facility.

Justin Nyari, 29, 1138 West 8th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine, possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Jason A. Palmer, 35, 1033 Chelsea Ave., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Christian D. Phenneger, 26, 7379 Orchard Drive, Fairview, Erie County, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Richard Aaron Pratt, 37, 1214 West 32nd St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Jose Daniel Rosa, 45, 1908 Myrtle St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Brian Scott Smith, 38, 557 Polito Drive, Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, possession with intent to deliver marijuana, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine and/or marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Michael D. Socie, 35, 837 24th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Gary Allen Stanbro, 31, 2668 Cochran St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to deliver cocaine, possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Brandon James Stanton, 27, 2126 Liberty St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver marijuana, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver marijuana, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Matthew James Stiles, 31, 2523 Hope Drive, Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Peter James Stull Sr., 43, 2308 Rollahome Drive, Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

Jamie Glennan Szymczak, 33, 546 West 9th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver cocaine, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver cocaine, possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Tamara Sue Wettekin, 46, 1334 West 10th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Lindsey B. Wilhelm, 27, 631 West 16th St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession of cocaine and criminal use of a communications facility.

Clifford McKinley Wright, 29, 1713 Walnut St., Erie, is charged with one count each of possession with intent to deliver marijuana, criminal conspiracy to possess with intent to deliver marijuana, possession of marijuana and criminal use of a communications facility.

e-mail from Commonwealth Media Services
photo from the AG's office

Nicholson Gets A-10 Honors

St. Bonaventure men’s basketball sophomore forward Andrew Nicholson (Mississauga, Ontario/Father Michael Goetz Secondary) has been named to both the Atlantic 10 Preseason All-Conference second team and All-Defensive team, announced during the league’s annual media day on Thursday.

Nicholson is the first Bonnie since 2005-06 to garner any kind of A-10 preseason accolade. The Mississauga, Ontario native is the eighth player in program history to earn preseason All-Conference status and just the fourth to be named to the All-Defensive team.

The reigning A-10 Rookie of the Year, Nicholson exploded onto the scene in 2008-09, averaging 12.5 points, 6.0 rebounds and 2.7 blocks per game. Nicholson led all A-10 rookies in six different categories, while ranking 11th and 12th in the nation, respectively, in blocks (81) and field goal percentage (.602). His .602 clip from the field established a new program single-season record, while his 81 blocks were the fourth most by an A-10 freshmen in league history.

Nicholson is the only A-10 player to be named to both the All-Conference and All-Defensive team. He is also one of just three underclassmen on the three All-Conference teams.

Also in a vote conducted by the league’s head coaches and select media, the Bonnies were picked to finish 11th in the A-10 preseason poll. The Brown and White return six players, including four starters, from last year’s team that finished with an overall record of 15-15 and a 6-10 mark in the A-10.

Head coach Mark Schmidt will appear on Thursday’s Atlantic 10 Media Day conference call at 1 p.m. All the information on the A-10's Media Day can be found at www.Atlantic10.com

St. Bonaventure will play its only exhibition game on Friday, November 6 when welcome Division II Mansfield visits the Reilly Center for a 7 p.m. tip.



All-Time A-10 Preseason All-Conference

2009-10, Andrew Nicholson, Second Team

2005-06, Ahmad Smith, Second Team

2004-05, Patrick Lottin, Third Team

2003-04, Marques Green, First Team

2002-03, Marques Green, First team

2001-02, JR Bremer, Second Team

2000-01, Peter Van Paassen, Third Team

1999-00, Tim Winn, Second Team

1999-00, Caswell Cyrus, Third Team



All-Time A-10 Preseason All-Defensive Team

2009-10, Andrew Nicholson

2003-04, Marques Green

2002-03, Marques Green

1999-00, Caswell Cyrus

1999-00, Tim Winn

1998-99, Caswell Cyrus

e-mail from SBU

H1N1 Vaccine Clinics at BRMC

(We're running this again as a public service)

Bradford Regional Medical Center is planning its first two H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine clinics for certain high risk groups, starting next week.

Pregnant women and people six months to 24 years old can obtain the vaccine from noon to 6 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 26 and Tues., Oct. 27. Patients will be screened for appropriateness and registered in the Outpatient Services Center lobby, N. Bennett Street Ext. No appointments are necessary and supplies are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Children under 10 will need two shots to be fully protected, given 28 days apart. A reminder card will be given to their care giver at the time of the first vaccine date.

Parental or guardian consent is required for those under 18 years of age. Officials said future H1N1 clinics will be scheduled as additional vaccine becomes available. Those with questions about the vaccine should contact their physicians. The public is asked to listen to 1490 WESB for updates on the H1N1 flu vaccine supplies at BRMC.

We're not blowing our own horn by asking listeners to stay tuned to WESB for updates on the vaccine supply. BRMC officials have chosen us to keep the public updated on the supply of the vaccine on Monday and Tuesday in case they run out.

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Obituary
Robert F. Hartle

Robert F. Hartle, 68, of 1359 Big Shanty Road, Lewis Run, passed away Tuesday, October 20th, 2009 at his residence surrounded by his loving family.

Born October 16, 1941, in Bradford, he was a son of the late Walter S. Hartle and Margaret (Gault) Hartle who survives him of Bradford

On August 16, 1980 in St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Mt Alton, he married Jane W. (Ward) Hartle who survives.

He attended Our Mother of Perpetual Help Church.

Mr. Hartle was a 1959 Graduate of Bradford Area High School. He was employed for 25 years at the Bradford Regional Airport, retiring in 2003. Following his retirement he worked part-time as a licensed treatment operator at the Lafayette Township water treatment facility for the Bradford Sanitary Authority.

All who knew him, will miss his musical talents, his sense of humor, his love of family and above all his humble and gentle ways.

In addition to his wife and mother he is survived by two daughters; Sheila Peacock of Cuba, NY and Jessica (Scott) Nicholas of Henderson, NV, three sons; Robert Hartle, Steve Hartle, and Christopher Hartle all of Lewis Run, four sisters, Jennifer Hartle, Sheila (the late Daniel) Potter, and Eve Hartle all of Bradford and Jeanette (the late Ed) Edmonds of Gifford, three brothers, William (the Late Linda) Hartle of Erie, Daniel Hartle of Derrick City, and Brian Hartle of Bradford, nine grandchildren; Amanda Nicholas, Shawna Nicholas, Stephenie Hartle, Michael Reynolds, Robert Hartle, Sharise Peacock, Teagan Peacock, Riley Peacock, and Nevaeh Peacock, one great granddaughter, Kimberly Hartle, ten nieces and nephews; William (Denise) Hartle, Daniel Hartle, James Hartle, Craig Hartle, David (Jen) Edmonds, Eric Norris, Susan Edmonds, Sara Edmonds, Danielle (James) Grady, and Anne (Todd) Zandy, his first wife, Judith Kahle of Cuba, NY, and many aunts, uncles, cousins, and extended family

Family will be receiving friends on Friday, October 23, 2009, from 4 to 7PM in the Hollenbeck-Cahill Funeral Homes Inc., East Main Street where prayer service will be held at 10:15AM on Saturday, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 11:00AM in Our Mother of Perpetual Help Church, Lewis Run with Father Samuel B. Slocum, pastor as celebrant. Burial will be in McKean Memorial Park.

Memorials, if desired, may be made to the charity of the donor's choice.

A Christian Wake Service will be held on Friday at 6:45 in the funeral home.

On line condolences may be made at www.hollenbeckcahill.com

AKtion Club Elects Officers

Mike Walter has been re-elected president of the AKtion Club.

Chelsea Albright was re-elected vice president; Rose Colella, secretary; and Ashley Peterson was elected treasurer.

Directors serving until 2010 are Tracy Carson and Jeff VanScoter. Directors serving until 2011 are Pete Carlson and Joe Lee.

Swearing in of officers was done by District Judge Dom Cercone.

Walter says the club's plans are working on Kiwanis Kapers, participating in the Salvation Army's Kettle Drive, continuing to raise money and plan for Relay for Life and working on First Night.

"We're scattered all over the place," Walter said of First Night. "We go wherever they need us."

Traffic Tie-Up Update

Traffic looked like this on East Main Street at around 7 p.m. Wednesday. (Thank goodness the family emergency I had to go home for wasn't life or death.) But the good news is, as I learned when I came back to the station, they got a lot of work done and we have a smooth road.

Wagner Calls for Reform of
Methods for Awarding Contracts

Auditor General Jack Wagner today called for the Rendell administration to reform its process of awarding contracts to private vendors after finding the state paid $592 million to Deloitte Consulting LLP for computer-related services over a four-year period while also giving it an additional $2.25 million in economic-development grants to help it service those same state contracts.

The 179-page report on Pennsylvania's dealing with Deloitte concluded that a single state agency should coordinate all contract awards and the Legislature should consider new laws to "tighten up and centralize" the bidding process, Wagner said during a news conference Wednesday.

"This is a textbook case of what happens when accountability, competition and transparency are not present in the daily operation of state government," Wagner said.

Department of General Services Secretary James Creedon said Wagner's report concludes that no laws were violated in the way contracts were awarded, nor did the audit find any ethics concerns. The entire audit focuses on past deficiencies, which have now been corrected, he said.

No state in the nation has undertaken a more dramatic and successful reorganization and consolidation of its procurement and IT operations to better incorporate private sector best practices than the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, he said.

Creedon added that by centralizing all procurement operations, the state has saved taxpayers $320 million over the past five years.

information gleaned from 2 news releases e-mailed from Commonwealth Media Services, the auditor general's Web site and Wagner's news conference aired on PCN.

Traffic Tie-Ups

Anyone who had to drive on East Main Street Wednesday knows how long the delays were. This photo was taken at about 2:30 p.m. when the line of traffic stretched from the Kendall Avenue intersection to Woodlawn Avenue. The delays were due to work being done at the intersection and the alternate route, Bolivar Drive, being partially closed while Route 219 bridges are being painted.

The situation hadn't improved by 6:30 p.m. I just looked outside and found tail lights as far as I could see on South Kendall, and more stalled traffic on East Main.

Lil Miss Street Dreams

Lil Miss Street Dreams Kylie Stiles, Street Dreams Car Club President Gary Hoy and Polly Mills of the Make-A-Wish Foundation pose for Bradford Era photographer Alan Hancock outside the WESB/WBRR studios Wednesday afternoon. Kylie, Hoy, Mills and Tubby Colella (owner of the Thunderbird) were guests on LiveLine and talked about the more than $3,000 the Lil Miss Street Dreams contestants raised for Make-A-Wish this year.

They were also the first guests on our first offical show that streamed live online. You can hear tomorrow's show live online at 12:40 p.m. at
http://www.wesb.com/liveline/index.html

Thursday's guest is Dr. Robert Tahara, director of Bradford Regional Medical Center's Peripheral Interventions Program and also Allegheny Vein & Vascular (and one of my very favorite people in Bradford).

Koresh Dance Company to Offer
Workshop at Pitt-Bradford

Koresh Dance Company assistant artistic director Melissa Rector will teach a master class for area dancers prior to the company’s performance at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford on Monday, Nov. 2.

The master class will take place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 1, in the dance studio at the Pitt-Bradford Sport and Fitness Center. The class is free, but enrollment is limited to 24 students and registration is required. Dancers should have at least a rudimentary knowledge of dance to benefit from this master class. Normal dance studio attire is expected.

“Last season we presented the Russian National Ballet, and their workshop was so popular we had to cut off the number of students who applied,” said Randy L. Mayes, director of arts programming at Pitt-Bradford. Mayes said that he expects to see the same response this year for Rector’s Koresh Dance Company master class.

Rector will be teaching the master class along with some of the Koresh dancers to assist and demonstrate. “The participants will not just get instruction from a single teacher. Rather, they are getting a teacher and some of the Koresh dancers, which is rare and makes for a superior master class,” Mayes said.

After graduating with her certificate of dance from The University of the Arts in 1993, Rector obtained a scholarship to study at the Pennsylvania Academy of Ballet.

Rector has been dancing with the Koresh Dance Company since its inception in 1991 and frequently travels the country to perform and teach master classes. She is also an instructor at the Koresh School of Dance, where she teaches a unique style that blends modern jazz and Luigi jazz dance technique.

“Pitt-Bradford Arts Programming is committed to providing high-quality cultural experiences in all arts disciplines, and dance has been historically underrepresented in this part of western Pennsylvania,” said Mayes. “As long as the demand for dance is strong, we hope to be able to continue booking major dance companies and providing high-quality workshops for regional dancers for many years to come.”

For more information, or to reserve a place in the class, call the Bromeley Family Theater box office at (814)362-5113 or Patty Colosimo, assistant director of arts programming, at (814)362-5155.

For disability-related needs, contact the Office of Disability Resources and Services at 814-362-7609 or arj4@pitt.edu

Tickets also remain for the Koresh Dance Company’s performance at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 2. The group will perform pieces from two of their most popular works, “Looking Back, Music from the 40s and 50s,” and from “Ev-o-lu-tion.” The cost of tickets are $26 and $22 for the public; and $11 and $9 for all students. The show is part of the university’s Prism Series. Tickets may be purchased by calling the box office.

e-mail from Kimberly Weinberg, Pitt-Bradford

KidShape Geared to Help Children


A weight-management program called KidShape for children between the ages of 6 and 14 is now seeking registrants throughout McKean County to participate in a nine-week session.

KidShape is a program for children who are in the 85th percentile for their body-mass index or above. The family-based program also requires a parent or guardian to attend each class for added support and reinforcement of what’s taught.

“The activities are fun and designed to promote healthy behavior changes such as increasing activity and choosing more nutritious snacks, drinks and meals,” says Mariann Kahle, Bradford Regional Medical Center’s worksite wellness coordinator who thought it was necessary to make KidShape available to overweight children in the county.

“When I saw this program I knew we had to bring it here,” she says.

KidShape is made possible through funding provided by Highmark Healthy High 5, an initiative of the Highmark Foundation.

The first nine-week KidShape session will be held Thursday, Jan. 21, to Thursday, March 18, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The Salvation Army at 111 Jackson Ave. The $10 registration fee is for a child and their parent or guardian to attend.

Other nine-week sessions for new participants will be held April 1 to May 27, and Sept. 23 to Nov. 17 at The Salvation Army.

“KidShape helps children choose healthy foods, enjoy an active lifestyle and learn to feel good about themselves,” Mrs. Kahle says, a registered dietitian who’s one of the program’s instructors.

“This is a very interactive program. It’s not a program where children just down and are lectured by instructors,” Mrs. Kahle says.

“There will be lots of fun activities and games. Goal setting and incentives are the focus,” she notes.

Along with her, other instructors are: Claudette Haner, a registered nurse at BRMC, who’s the program’s site coordinator; Marc Fernandes, a mental health professional with BRMC’s Bradford Recovery Services; and Mark Kelley, director of the Sports Medicine Program at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

“Our staff is comprised of high-energy individuals who are very positive and children-focused instructors,” Mrs. Kahle says.

“This will be a very positive and beneficial experience for those children who attend,” she adds.

Those interested in registering for the first nine-week KidShape session should call Mrs. Kahle at 362-8383 by Dec. 21.

Pictured, Mariann Kahle (center), Bradford Regional Medical Center’s (BRMC’s) worksite wellness coordinator and an instructor for the new weight-management program KidShape, holds a flier to promote the program’s start in January. With her are program instructors Marc Fernandes, a mental health professional with BRMC’s Bradford Recovery Systems, and Claudette Haner, a registered nurse at the hospital.
(Photo courtesy of BRMC)

Halloween Harvest Festival at Tops

Tops Friendly Markets is holding a Halloween Harvest Festival on Saturday, Oct. 24 to celebrate and recognize the growers who supply fresh, locally-grown produce to all Tops stores everyday.

Since transitioning back to a locally operated and managed grocer, Tops has increased by 40 percent the number of local growing partners it uses. Tops has more than 170 farms and grower co-operatives in Western and Central New York now providing fresh produce to its stores.

“One of our objectives from day one has been to ensure that we are providing our customers with the freshest, locally-grown produce available,” said Frank Curci, president and CEO of Tops. “Local growers are very important to the economies of the regions we serve and we believe in not only supporting this industry but highlighting what they do and this festival is just one part of that effort.”

Curci added that there are various benefits associated with choosing products from local farms. He cited the positive impact on the local economy and the increased support of local family farmers, the quality of the produce and environmental benefits such as reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by cutting down on the distance it takes for the fruits and vegetables to travel from the farm to stores. Tops also utilizes an aggressive marketing campaign to highlight its commitment to local growers both in-store, in advertising materials and with special events such as the Halloween Harvest Festival.

The Halloween Harvest Festival celebrates the locally grown produce popular during the fall season, including apples, pumpkins, gourds, Indian corn and squash along with fresh-baked apple and pumpkin pies and floral selections. From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 24, all Tops stores will celebrate with various in-store specials and family-friendly activities.

“The fall season is a great time to showcase the best that Tops’ local growers provide,” said Sam Qureshi, Tops’ director of produce and floral. “We have planned this week-long celebration to offer our customers the freshest fall produce and we’ll have some great values available to them as well, especially with New York State apples.”

Qureshi explained that one of the sales includes customers filling a five-pound tote bag with red delicious, empire and ginger apples for $2.49.

“In addition to all of the in-store specials, each Tops store is joining in the celebration of the fall produce season by hosting their own special events for children and families. We will also have local growers at various Tops stores to greet customers and talk about their produce,” Qureshi said.

Among the activities available at each store on Oct. 24 will be a Halloween costume contest and in-store trick-or-treating, a Tops associates costume contest, pumpkin painting, face painting and other activities. At various locations, local growers will be on hand to discuss local produce.

Specific activities will vary by store.

Katie McKenna, Tops

Fiction Writer to Read Stories at
Pitt-Bradford October 27

Author Jody Lisberger, who has had her short stories published in various anthologies and whose first collection was just released, will read from her fiction on Tuesday, Oct. 27, at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

She will read at noon in the Mukaiyama University Room of the Frame-Westerberg Commons as part of the university’s Spectrum Series. A question-and-answer session, reception and book signing will follow.

“I like her stories’ complex and layered portraits of characters who discover that nothing is ever quite as it seems their wordplay and the risks they take with language and form,” said Dr. Nancy McCabe, associate professor of writing at Pitt-Bradford. “In addition to writing terrific stories, Jody is also a warm person and good teacher who I think will inspire and encourage beginning writers.”

Lisberger’s story collection “Remember Love” was published in May 2008. Her stories have appeared in “Fugue,” “Michigan Quarterly Review,” “Thema,” “Confrontation” and “The Louisville Review.”

In 2003, she took third place in the “American Literary Review” fiction contest and was a finalist in the 2004 “Quarterly West” fiction competition.

She earned a doctorate in English from Boston University and served in the low-residency master of fine arts in the writing program at Vermont College.

Lisberger has taught for more than 25 years at the University of Rhode Island, Brown, Harvard, Tufts, Holy Cross and Boston universities. She is director of Women’s Studies at URI.

More information about the Spectrum Series is available by contacting Patty Colosimo, assistant director of arts programming, at (814) 362-5155.

e-mail from Kimberly Weinberg, Pitt-Bradford

Natural Gas Caucus Launched

Congressman Glenn Thompson and other members of Congress officially launched the House Natural Gas Caucus today at a hearing to discuss the state of US natural gas.

The hearing included testimony from industry experts, business officials and scholars, including Dr. Robert Watson of Penn State, who said over the next 5 years Marcellus Shale will probably transform Pennsylvania into a net exporter of natural gas.

He said in 10 years the industry could be generating about 175,000 jobs.

Thompson said the country works toward clean, sustainable energy development, renewable energy is not at the place yet where it can take over for the 85 percent of power and energy still generated by fossil fuels.

T. Boone Pickens reinforced those views when he testified that, “Natural gas is the bridge to the next fuel. We have 2000 trillion cubic feet of untapped natural gas in this country, which is equal to 350 billion barrels of oil. That is one and one-half times more oil than in Saudi Arabia. This is a global game changer.”

We’ve got to get off foreign oil, and the only immediately available transportation fuel that can replace it is natural gas,” said Pickens.

Pickens explained that in September this country purchased 357 million barrels of oil at a cost of $25 billion. He said two-thirds of our trade deficit is for the purchase of oil. He pointed to the Marcellus shale play identified on a U.S. map and said, “Marcellus shale—can you imagine how many jobs are going to be developed there?”

information from a press release e-mailed from Tina Kreisher in Thompson's office

BRMC Plans First H1N1 Vaccine
Clinics for Monday, Tuesday

Bradford Regional Medical Center is planning its first two H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine clinics for certain high risk groups, starting next week.

Pregnant women and people six months to 24 years old can obtain the vaccine from noon to 6 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 26 and Tues., Oct. 27. Patients will be screened for appropriateness and registered in the Outpatient Services Center lobby, N. Bennett Street Ext. No appointments are necessary and supplies are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Children under 10 will need two shots to be fully protected, given 28 days apart. A reminder card will be given to their care giver at the time of the first vaccine date.

Parental or guardian consent is required for those under 18 years of age. Officials said future H1N1 clinics will be scheduled as additional vaccine becomes available. Those with questions about the vaccine should contact their physicians. The public is asked to listen to 1490 WESB for updates on the H1N1 flu vaccine supplies at BRMC.

e-mail from Kimberly Maben, BRMC

Man Accused of Threatening to Burn Down House Waives Hearing

A man accused of threatening to a kill a family by burning down their house has waived his preliminary hearing.

On September 13, Michael Schoonover called the family a number of times and made the threats, according to papers filed in District Judge Rich Luther's office.

Ten people, including small children, were in the house at the time Schoonover allegedly made the threats.

For those alleged incidents, he's charged with terroristic threats and harassment.

On September 9, Schoonover allegedly hit a man several times in the Walmart parking lot.

Courts papers say that he grabbed John Vanyo's hoodie, pulled it over his head and hit Vanyo 6 or 7 times, telling him that was for causing the breakup between him and his girlfriend. He then allegedly hit Vanyo 6 or 7 more times.

For that incident, he's charged with simple assault, harassment and disorderly conduct.


from affidavits of probable cause filed in Luther's office in the Foster Township Municipal Building

Accused Carjacker Waives Hearing

A man accused of carjacking a vehicle from the Zippo parking lot on Barbour Street has waived his preliminary hearing.

According to papers filed in District Judge Dom Cercone's office, 24-year-old Michael Blum of Congress Street approached Ryan Anderson on August 6 and demanded the keys to his vehicle. When Anderson refused, Blum pulled out a knife, held it to Anderson's throat and said "Give me your f***ing keys. I am not kidding."

Blum's alleged accomplice, Jessica Gulledge, got in the car and backed it up while Blum was still holding the knife on Anderson, according to the affidavit of probable cause.

Blum also demanded Anderson's wallet. The second time, Anderson gave him a pack of cigarettes.

On August 7, the stolen vehicle was involved in a chase that started in Smethport and ended in Limestone, NY.

Blum is charged with robbery, robbery of a motor vehicle, conspiracy, theft by unlawful taking, simple assault and reckless endangerment.

He's in jail on $50,000 bail.

from the affidavit of probable cause filed in Cercone's Union Square office

Woman Facing Theft Charges

A Genesee woman is accused of stealing money from her employer.

State police say 20-year-old Tiffany Moag stole $13,500 from the cash register at the Acorn Market in Genesee between June 16 and September 9.

Her bail was set at $10,000.

fax from Coudersport-based state police

Don't Have a Radio Handy ...

... but want to listen to the LiveLine live?

Starting today at 12:40 p.m. you can do that at

http://www.wesb.com/liveline/index.html


Today's guests include Polly Mills of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Lil Miss Street Dreams Kylie Stiles and Street Dreams Car Club President Gary Hoy.


(bear with us because we're still testing)

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Coach Tom Tessena Honored

Bradford High Cross Country and Track Coach Tom Tessena looks at the plaque bearing his name at GGB Cross Country Course. Tuesday afternoon, the permanent finish line was unveiled and dedicated to Tessena, who has been the coach for nearly 40 years. Below is the ribbon cutting ceremony.



Photos by Frank Williams

Causer Opposes State Regulation of Outdoor Wood-Fired Boilers

HARRISBURG - Rep. Martin Causer (R-Turtlepoint) is speaking out against proposed regulations from the state's Environmental Quality Board that would place significant restrictions on the use of outdoor wood-fired boilers in Pennsylvania.

"These boilers are one of the last affordable forms of home heating for many rural Pennsylvanians," Causer said. "Government intervention has helped drive up the cost of electricity, oil and gas, and now it's going to do the same to wood-fired boilers.

"This is just another example of 'big brother' government stepping in where it is not wanted or needed," he added. "Local governments are more than capable of regulating these boilers if they believe it is warranted."

Under the proposed regulations:

· A person may not purchase, sell, offer for sale, distribute or install a boiler unless it meets Phase 2 standards for efficiency.

· New boilers must be installed at least a minimum of 150 feet from the nearest property line.

· New boilers must have a permanently attached stack that must be at least 10 feet above ground and extend at least two feet above the highest peak of the highest residence located within 150 feet of the boiler.

· Existing boilers must also have a permanently attached stack that is at least 10 feet above ground and extend at least two feet above the highest peak of the highest residence located within 500 feet of the boiler.

· Only clean wood, wood pellets made from clean wood and certain home heating oil, natural gas or propane fuels can be used in the boilers.

The regulations are currently open for public comment, and Causer is encouraging people directly affected by the regulations, as well as those concerned about state government overstepping its authority, to make their voices heard on the issue.

"We need to stand up and tell the Rendell administration that enough is enough," Causer said.

Comments must be received by the Environmental Quality Board by Jan. 4, 2010. People have three options for submitting comments:

· Send written comments to Environmental Quality Board, P.O. Box 8477, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8477 (express mail: Rachel Carson State Office Building, 16th Floor, 400 Market St., Harrisburg, PA 17101-2301). No fax comments will be accepted.

· Send written comments via e-mail to RegComments@state.pa.us. A subject heading of the proposal and a return name and address must be included in each e-mail. If the sender does not receive acknowledgement that the comments were received within two working days, the sender should resubmit his or her comments.

· Attend one of four public hearings scheduled on the matter. The closest hearing will be held in Williamsport at 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3, at the Department of Environmental Protection Office, 208 W. Third St., Suite 101, Williamsport. Additional hearings are slated for Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre and Cranberry Township.

Visit RepCauser.com for a complete hearing schedule and the proposed regulations.

e-mail from Causer's office

Greenleaf Introduces Legislation Addressing “Sexting” by Minors

State Senator Stewart J. Greenleaf (R, Montgomery, Bucks) has introduced legislation in response to recent incidents of “sexting” by minor children in Pennsylvania. Sexting is a combination of the words texting and sex, and refers to the transmission of sexually explicit images and videos using a telecommunication device.

There have been many incidences of sexting in Pennsylvania by minors, and district attorneys have struggled with finding the appropriate offense for this inappropriate activity. Teenagers have been charged with everything from disorderly conduct to child pornography. The proposed legislation would provide guidance for law enforcement, and an alternative to seeking a conviction for a more serious crime.

Senate Bill 1121, now before the Senate Judiciary Committee, establishes the criminal offense of “dissemination of prohibited materials by a minor” (sexting), and prohibits a person under 18 years of age from using a computer or telecommunication device to knowingly transmit or distribute a photograph or other depiction of himself or herself or of another minor who is at least 13 years of age, in a state of nudity, to another person who is not more than four years younger or more than four years older than the person transmitting the photograph. The offense of sexting is graded as a summary offense and the offender will be eligible for a diversionary program which will include an educational component.

“We need to find ways to deter young people from engaging in this behavior,” said Greenleaf. “I also believe that we need to begin having thorough discussions about the legal and non-legal consequences of using a computer or a telecommunication device to share sexually suggestive materials.”

The legislation targets sexting between young people of roughly the same age (no more than four years younger or four years older). If a person disseminates a photograph of a young child (under 13 years of age) in a state of nudity or disseminates a photograph of himself or herself or of another minor who is at least 13 years of age, in a state of nudity, to a person more than four years younger or four years older, the offense may be treated much more seriously. In addition, if the photograph depicts sexual intercourse, deviate sexual intercourse, sadism, masochism or masturbation, the offense would be treated as a more serious offense than sexting.

In drafting this legislation, it was noted that the juvenile courts do not have jurisdiction over summary offenses. As a result, a juvenile who is charged with a misdemeanor or even a felony and adjudicated delinquent in juvenile court may be treated less harshly than a juvenile found guilty of a summary offense before a magisterial district judge. In addition, the records of a juvenile who is adjudicated delinquent are protected while the records of a juvenile found guilty of a summary offense are public. Finally, expungement of a juvenile’s record is easier than expungement of a summary offense.

While giving the juvenile courts jurisdiction over summary offenses would overwhelm those courts, making them less effective, some changes are necessary to make the treatment of juveniles more equitable regardless of whether the juvenile is before a magisterial district judge or a juvenile court judge. As a result, the legislation establishing the criminal offense of sexting will include changes to the Juvenile Act. While summary cases involving a juvenile would continue to be heard by a magisterial district judge, these changes will apply many of the same protections that are available to juveniles adjudicated delinquent to juveniles found guilty of sexting or other summary offenses.

“Sexting has become a disturbing trend and must be addressed,” said Greenleaf. “In the future, I hope that we are better prepared to educate all young people about the dangers of this kind of behavior and why it is wrong.”

e-mail from Greenleaf's office

More Information Released on Skeletal Remains Found in Sept.

The Cattaraugus County sheriff's Office is looking for help in the identification of skeletal remains found on the shore line of the Allegheny Reservoir on September 26.

A forensic exam showed that the remains are of a female between the ages of 25 and 45, but likely 30 to 40. She was 5' 1" to 5' 8" with a small build and probably weighed 105 to 125 pounds.

It has also been suggested that the remains have been in the water from one to five years.

An exam also revealed that a single rib shows evidence of a healed fracture, and there was a broken left tibia.

The remains were found with one size 6 left winter boot made of tan suede. The boot is fleece-lined and made in China under the brand name Hotcakes.

Dental records are on file with the Erie County Medical Examiner's Office for comparison and DNA is being obtained for the FBI's Combined DNA Index System (CODIS).

Anyone who believes they have information about the identity of the person is asked to contact the sheriff's office at 716-938-9191.

info, including photos, from the Cattaraugus County Sheriff's Office

Program Named for Hunter Kelly

The National Institutes of Health on Monday announced the establishment of a research program to enhance newborn screening, in memory of the son of National Football League Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly.

Hunter Kelly died in 2005 at age 8 1/2 of Krabbe disease, a rare, fatal genetic disorder affecting the nervous system.

After Hunter's diagnosis in 1997, the Kellys and their family members established the Hunter's Hope Foundation to raise awareness and fund research for Krabbe disease and related disorders (known as leukodystrophies), and to support families affected by these conditions. Jim Kelly said that the principal focus of the Hunter Kelly Foundation is to educate and advocate for expanded and universal newborn screening for all possible diseases

For more on this story, go to the National Institutes of Health.

Koresh Dance Company to Perform
at Pitt-Bradford November 2

Koresh Dance Company, hailed as “contemporary in style and sophisticated in technique” by the L.A. Times, will take to the stage on Monday, Nov. 2, at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

The Philadelphia-based troupe will perform at 7:30 p.m. in the Bromeley Family Theater in Blaisdell Hall. Tickets are $26 and $22 for the public and $11 and $9 for students. The concert is part of the Prism series, formerly known as the Season Subscription Series.

Ten members of the dance company will blend ballet, modern dance and jazz choreography into a unique and dynamic evening of dance, said Randy Mayes, director of arts programming at Pitt-Bradford. Founded in 1991, the group is led by Israel-born choreographer and artistic director Ronen Koresh.

The first half of the performance, “Looking Back,” will feature music from the 1940s and ’50s. It was partly commissioned by Dance Celebration, a co-presentation of Dance Affiliates and Penn Presents, and will include Benny Goodman’s version of “Sing, Sing, Sing”; Peggy Lee’s version of “Fever” and Ella Fitzgerald singing “Night and Day.”

The second part of the show will be one of Koresh’s newest dances, “Ev-o-lu-tion,” which examines communication of emotions before language.

“Koresh has been one of the most dominant, modern dance companies in the country now for over a decade,” Mayes said. “What makes this company stand out is Ronen Koresh himself. It is said that the role of an artist is to define us and our time for future generations. Ronen’s works defines us better than any other artist I know.”

Bringing Koresh to northwestern Pennsylvania, he said, is an unprecedented opportunity for regional dance students and audiences to see a company of this caliber.

“Dance has been under presented in this region, and we wish to fill that void,” Mayes said. “The Koresh Dance Company has won awards and acclaim most companies could only dream about, but the real test of a modern company is how the audience reacts to its works. Koresh excels in the response of the audiences where it performs. We expect a dynamic show that will be well received, and I believe the dancers will exceed that standard easily.”

A performance for area children will be presented on Tuesday, Nov. 3, in the Bromeley Family Theater for the Kaleidoscope school matinee series, formerly New Horizons. The dance company’s visit is part of a three-day residency.

Tickets are available by calling the Bromeley Family Theater Box Office at (814) 362-5113. Videos, including a documentary by public television WHYY, photos and more information about the company can be seen at www.koreshdance.org.

PGC's Roe To Appear on PCN

HARRISBURG –Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe will appear on Pennsylvania Cable Network’s “PCN Call-In” program on Thursday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. Viewers of the hour-long program can call in questions about hunting, trapping and wildlife management to PCN toll-free at 1-877-PA65001 (726-5001). (Please check local listings for the PCN channel in your area, or PCN’s website at www.pcntv.com It's Channel 9 in Bradford.)

Available on nearly 150 cable systems throughout the state, PCN is a nonprofit, nonpartisan cable television network that airs unedited live and same-day coverage of Pennsylvania House and Senate sessions, press conferences, speeches and other public forums where the business of the state is debated, discussed and decided.

PCN’s live interactive “Call-In” program allows viewers to speak directly with government officials, newsmakers, and other knowledgeable parties on current Commonwealth issues. For more information, visit PCN’s website (www.pcntv.com)

game commission

From WESB.com

October 20, 2009 08:10AM
Sheffield Pharmacy Robbed

A man robbed the Sheffield Pharmacy Monday afternoon. Sheffield Township Police say the man, who was wearing a dark ski mask, blue jeans, a dark jacket with a gray vest over, was carrying a black backpack. He displayed a large handgun and made-off with an undertemined amount of prescription pills. The robber headed east on the railroad tracks.

October 20, 2009 07:10AM
Oil Spill on Tionesta Creek

An oil spill was discovered Sunday along Hastings Run in Forest County. Department of Environmental Protection investigators say that 630 gallons of oil leaked out of holding tanks and 200 gallons of the oil entered the stream and then flowed into Tionesta Creek. There was an oil slick which reached 21 miles down the Creek to near Nebraska Bridge State Police discovered that valves were open on three of the holding tanks in a five-tank battery owned by Duhring Resource Co. of Sheffield. The incident has been deemed suspicous and is being classified as criminal mischief.

October 20, 2009 06:10AM
Eldred Firefigher Charged in Department Fires

An Eldred volunteer firefighter has been charged with the fires at the Eldred Borough and Township Fire Department buildings. State Police say 38 year-old Scott McClain of Eldred is charged with arson and criminal mischief for the two fires, one early Monday at the borough fire department and the second blaze at the township fire department building on August 6th. Investigators say McClain ignited rolls of bathroom tissue in the storage closet in the men's bathroom early Monday at the borugh building. The fire caused more than $5,000 in damage to the structure. Police say that fire in August at the township’s second station was set by McClain who ignited a flare that burned a fire truck and building and caused more than $300,000 in damages. McClain is jailed on $500,000 bail. There are several other fires that the fire marshall is looking into, including one on July 20 at the Eldred Borough Ambulance building, which destoryed two ambulances. No one has been charged in any of those fires.

posted by Frank Williams at WESB.com

Scary Movies

Scott Douglas has made a list of his five scariest movies and he'd like everyone else to give him their opinions. Go to Scott's Halloween Page at WBRRFM.com to answer the poll question and add your comments. You can add your comments here, too.


As for my scariest movies ...

1.Halloween. My friends and I saw it on the big screen in Olean and, as if the movie wasn't scary enough, after we parked in the big parking lot at Bona's (behind Plassman Hall) at about 11 o'clock on a weekday night, we had to walk all the way to Devereux Hall which, as most people "know," is haunted.

2.Poltergeist. My friends and I were in New City, NY, and wanted to catch a movie but couldn't decide which one. By the time we decided, the theater was almost full and we ended up sitting in about the third row. All those corpses popping out of the ground and coming right at you? Scary! (Even scarier now is ... I can't remember why I was in New City. It had to be my friend's graduation party, although we graduated a few weeks before the movie came out.)

3.The Exoricst. I can't even watch the edited version on TV now. I was 13 when I saw it, and it was two years before I even thought about sneaking into another R-rated movie. (Shampoo, in case you're wondering.)